Ukraine Story 1 Final

100 Years Later, Scholars Remember Ukrainian Revolution

By Anne Ehart

Panelists at the Friday, February 24 “Ukrainian Statehood 1917-21: Institutions and Individuals” conference at Columbia University.

100 years ago today, Ukraine was in the midst of a struggle for independence from Russia. From 1917-1921, war was waged between Ukrainian independence and Soviet forces, resulting in the creation of the Ukrainian National Republic.

Today, Ukraine is once again butting heads with Russia, fighting off Russian military and pro-Russia separatist groups attempting to take control of Ukraine.

On February 24 and 25, the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University commemorated the 100-year anniversary of the Ukrainian revolution with a series of panel discussions entitled “Ukrainian statehood 1917-21: Institutions and Individuals.”

Ukraine Story 2 Pitches

I have a couple potential stories for the next assignment. Though these are not newsworthy, there is a Ukrainian concert followed by a meet the composer and a Ukrainian poetry reading through the Ukrainian Institute of America. While it would also be interesting to me to get a taste of Ukrainian culture, any coverage of Ukraine right now gives it exposure and generates awareness for it, which is greatly needed. In addition, either of these could make lovely radio or photo pieces. Another more newsworthy idea has to do with the release of movie “Bitter Harvest” in late February. The movie depicts the Holodomor starvation in Ukraine in the 1930s. While there are many reviews out about the movie, I’d like to hear from Ukrainians. Are they glad a movie is shedding light on this devastating part of Ukrainian history? What do they think of the movie itself? Even better, can I find someone who lived through this time to give their input? This would be a written piece. I need to do some reaching out to gauge the quality of the story I would get for the movie piece, whereas the less newsworthy concert and poetry events seem like a no brainer. 

Ukraine Story 1 First Draft

100 Years Later, Scholars Remember Ukrainian Revolution

By Anne Ehart

Panelists at the Friday, February 24 “Ukrainian Statehood 1917-21: Institutions and Individuals” conference at Columbia University.

100 years ago today, Ukraine was in the midst of a struggle for independence from Russia. From 1917-1921, war was waged between Ukrainian independence and Soviet forces, resulting in the creation of the Ukrainian National Republic.

Today, Ukraine is once again butting heads with Russia, fighting off Russian military and pro-Russia separatist groups attempting to take control of Ukraine.

On February 24 and 25, the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University commemorated the 100-year anniversary of the Ukrainian revolution with a series of panel discussions entitled “Ukrainian statehood 1917-21: Institutions and Individuals.”

Ukraine Pitch #1

This Friday the 24th, the Ukrainian Institute of America in collaboration with the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University will be hosting an International Conference titled “Ukrainian Statehood 1917-21: Institutions and Individuals.” The conference commemorates the 100-year anniversary of the Ukrainian Revolution and the creation of the modern Ukrainian state. Now more than ever, it is a relevant time to recognize Ukraine’s successes and the current status of its freedom. It is inevitable that Trump’s relationship with Russia and whether he will be an ally to Ukraine will be discussed. Following the two-hour panel is a reception in which I hope to speak to the panelists or attendees. I hope to interview people on how they feel the “modern Ukrainian state” has changed over the years and how they picture it in the future. Realistically, do they see Trump and Russia dismanteling the Ukrainian state or do they still see hope for independence? I will also formulate my questions based on the panel discussion. My hope is to create a radio podcast, with clips from the panel itself, sound of crowds chatting, hopefully some in Ukrainian, and one on one interviews.

Ukraine Beat Memo

Official language: Ukrainian (67.5%)

Russian (29.6%)

Religions: Orthodox, Ukrainian Orthodox, Ukrainian Greek Catholic, Roman Catholic.

Ukraine’s population is overwhelmingly Christian; the vast majority – up to two-thirds – identify themselves as Orthodox, but many do not specify a particular branch

Ukrainian News Outlets:

Kyiv Post

Tsnua

Interview:

Roksolana Florko

609-598-1837

Roksolana is a former boss of mine who is Ukrainian-American. I asked her about where the Ukrainian community is located in NYC, if there are any landmarks of Ukrainian culture here, and where she gets her Ukrainian news from.

Currently:

Ukrainian-Americans are concerned about Trump’s friendliness with Russian president Vladimir Putin, which could mean Ukraine could lose the US as its ally. The US has provided a lot of help and understanding in defending Ukraine from Russian separatists taking control. Since Trump has taken office, violence has begun again in eastern Ukraine where separatist groups have control.

Russia annexed Ukraine’s Crimea in 2014 but yesterday (February 14) Trump announced that he fully expects Russia to return Crimea to Ukraine and de-escalate violence in Ukraine. However, at the same time, he stated he expects to get along with Russia.

Avdiivka is a strategically important city under Ukrainian control that was attacked by military grade missiles on January 28. Video surveillance reveals that the attack was carried out in militant controlled Donetsk (Ukraine). Russia tried to blame Ukraine for the attack, but Ukraine clearly does not have access to weapons of this caliber.

Where are Ukrainians?

“When they first moved here, they all lived in the East Village. But now that it has gotten more expensive there, they have moved out to Yonkers, Brooklyn (Brighton Beach, Sheepshead Bay) or New Jersey. But for holidays and church we still gather in the East Village,” –Roksolana Florko

Landmarks:

Ukrainian Museum (East Village)

St. George Academy (private, Ukrainian Catholic high school)

Soyuziuka–Ukrainian heritage center (upstate)

“I have friends that visit here every summer or send their kids here to learn Ukrainian or about Ukrainian culture,” –Roksolana Florko

National Geographic

When I think of National Geographic, I first think of the photos. Growing up, my family would receive the magazine subscription in the mail and the beautiful pictures from around the world shined on the glossy pages.

Nat Geo is known for using photos to make their stories incredibly moving. Nat Geo’s work focuses on culture, the environment, nature, and animals around the world rather than breaking news topics. However, during historical moments, such as war or political turmoil, Nat Geo will capture what human life was like during these times. Nat Geo stories are longer, feature articles. The extensive time and research that goes into crafting these stories and capturing the photos constitutes lengthy articles.

One of the most well-known Nat Geo photos is the green-eyed Afghan girl that was on the cover in June 1985. The refugee girl was photographed at age 12 during the war in Afghanistan and has since been identified and located. In 2002, Nat Geo set out looking for her and upon finding her, published an article telling her story. Even more recently, Sharbat Gula was arrested in Pakistan for illegally obtaining a Pakistani identification card. The photo of young Sharbat Gula resurfaced in the years since 1985 around 9/11 and the subsequent war in the Middle East.

One controversy at Nat Geo is from 1982, when a cover photo of the Pyramids of Giza was altered. This is regarded as the first major scandal of the digital photography age.

2002 rediscovery of Afghan girl:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2002/04/afghan-girl-revealed/

Afghan girl arrested October 2016:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/27/world/asia/afghan-woman-in-famed-national-geographic-photo-is-arrested-in-pakistan.html?_r=0

Altered pyramids image:

http://www.alteredimagesbdc.org/national-geographic/

Ukrainian Community in NYC

I am thinking about profiling the Ukrainian immigrants who feel affected by Trump’s presidency. Trump’s alleged friendliness with Russian president Vladimir Putin puts the US’s alliance with Ukraine in danger, and the independence they have fought for in jeopardy. Last semester, I did a feature article on this but only spoke to immigrants living outside of NYC. I would also like to follow this issue more, as Trump’s presidency continues and relations with Russia unfold.