importance of quality book-making

Charles Richardson discusses the state of book-making in the United States in the article “Book-making in America.” He starts of by saying that more people started to read more and that newspaper audiences increase so do the number of people who read books. Even though there was increase in readership, he says that the quality of new books decreased. He compared the paper, construction, and printing of book in America, Germany, and France.

This article was important to our class since a broad focus in our class was to learn about and appreciate the art of making a book. Making a book is much more than writing a compelling and original story. Many people think that the main labor of a book belongs to the author. However printing pages and binding a book takes a manuscript from being a concept to a marketable book. People may not usually consider all the work that went into the creation of a book. The type of paper, print, clothe that creates the front and back cover of books all play a role in the feel of a book.

Richardson noticed that the books being printed after the Civil War, were not as ornate or beautiful as previous books. A comparison can be made to today. Many books are offered in soft covered and hard covered editions at bookstores and on the internet. Today’s books are also available in a digital format. As Richardson stated, books became more popular but the process was made more efficient. As with most things quick efficient processes create a large number of products but each individual product is of a lesser quality. Mass produced books served to be read by many. Books that were handcrafted were considered pieces of art and collected as heirlooms. Books printed in small numbers were more expensive and highly decorated.

One thought on “importance of quality book-making

  1. Is this a writeup for one of those book-making related field-trips you attended?

    If so, first of all, I suggest you re-edit the title of your article. The title of your article should fall into one of a specific styles such as APA style title or Chicago-style titles.

    Second, I suggest that you refer to the requirements for field-trip write-ups that Prof. Curseen posted on this blog. It clearly stated that your write up is supposed to be covering:
    1)For each field trip, you must submit a 2 page double spaced, 1 inch margins
    2)The first 1/4- 1/3 of the write up should describe the event (place, time, content, purpose, etc.).
    3)The remainder of the write up should focus on a specific aspect of the event that illuminated for you something about the various labors that go into the book.
    4)You may in the very last part of the paper contemplate how what you gleaned from this event might influence your book project.

    In your write-up, it seems like you have the intendancy to cover all the points but fail to expand each point enough to make a solid one. For example, you did seem to share with us something you valued from the article from Charles Richardson, however, you fail to provide description on one specific aspect of it. You only mentioned that “Making a book is much more than writing a compelling and original story”, “However printing pages and binding a book takes a manuscript from being a concept to a marketable book”, “The type of paper, print, clothe that creates the front and back cover of books all play a role in the feel of a book.” It is too broad. Why don’t you choose a specific topic such as paper to discuss how the different materials of paper will affect the book it is making out of?

    Most importantly, you should have articulated how exactly this illuminating aspect will effect you in your bookmaking process. Since there is not an illustration of a specific aspect of this book that has illuminated you about book making, it makes sense that you did not mention how it is helping you in your book making process. I hope you find this comment helpful.

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