Entrepreneurship Courses at Baruch College

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Undergraduate

Required courses

Electives

Graduate 

Required courses

UNDERGRADUATE REQUIRED COURSES

Entrepreneurship Management: MGT 3960 or MGT 3960H (Hybrid course)
3 hours; 3 credits

This course is intended to provide the student with a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge about small business. Ideas, concepts, and philosophies representing a logical unfolding of the salient topics of the subject area are presented in lecture form. Related case work is employed to allow an opportunity to apply the principles learned in typical situations, a “what to do” and “how to do it” approach to small business management.

Entrepreneurial Experiences: MGT 4961 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

This course offers BBA students the opportunity to learn from case studies why and how some businesses are successful while others fail. Lectures will focus on specific entrepreneurs and their businesses. Students will determine the characteristics, environment, and strategy required for success. Guest entrepreneurs will be invited to speak, and their business ventures analyzed. Teams of students will present one of the cases to the class; each student will also write an analysis of one of the other cases that is presented in class. The course will cover the full range of relevant issues from conception and startup phase, financial issues, valuation techniques, and exit strategies. Special issues such as ethical considerations, not-for-profit sector entrepreneurship, and turnaround management will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: MGT 3960 (formerly MGT 3860) or MGT 3960H.

 Family Business Management: MGT 4962 (One hybrid section)

3 hours; 3 credits

The course offers students the opportunity to explore introductory family business topics/issues such as business formation, growth and expansion, strategic management, professionalization, succession, location choices, and family dynamics, conflicts, and relationships relative to the business. An overview of families who own businesses and the profiles of their businesses will be presented along with the examination of the course topics relative to the various stages of business activity, including feasibility, start-up, on-going maintenance, expansion or redirection, and exit or transfer. The content of the course will include lectures, case studies, and group project work and presentations.

Prerequisite: MGT 3960 (formerly MGT 3860) or MGT 3960H.

 Entrepreneurial Start-Ups: MGT 4963 (One hybrid section)

3 hours; 3 credits

The purpose of this course is to take BBA students through the process of initiating a business venture from the conceptualization phase to the preparation of a detailed and realistic business plan. While the course will provide an overview of issues such as entrepreneurship itself and the entrepreneurial character, its main focus is on specific issues, stages, and the process of developing a new business. Each student will be required to produce a detailed business plan. Students present their business plans to the class for feedback and critique.

Prerequisite: MGT 3960 (formerly MGT 3860 or MGT 3960H.

 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP ELECTIVE COURSES:

Leadership Development and Entrepreneurial Applications: MGT 4965 (Hybrid course)

3 hours, 3 credits

This online course is designed to provide an environment for developing entrepreneurial leadership skills in a project-based learning setting. The core course component will be Leadership Consulting Teams, which will include 3-5 students. Each team will focus on identifying a leadership related problem in their community including emerging enterprises of all types and varieties such as businesses, not-for-profits, and governments. The consulting teams will analyze their problems and prepare viable solutions. Each group will work closely with the instructor who will assist in each group’s project work. After completion of the course, the projects will be presented at a CUNY-wide competitive event sponsored by the CUNY Institute for Virtual Enterprise (www.ive.cuny.edu). Additionally, there will be weekly leadership readings, which will serve as interacting-discussion starters for an ongoing online dialogue about leadership, teamwork, leadership research, and case studies, particularly from the viewpoint of entrepreneurship.

Prerequisite: MGT 3120 or permission of the Department.

Social Networking for Entrepreneurs: MGT 4966 (Hybrid course)

3 hours, 3 credits

The objective of this course is to provide students with the requisite skills to understand and be able to identify and evaluate how new ventures and existing enterprises are utilizing social communication to create more transparent information networks by engaging and connecting internal and external stakeholders. These social networks are multidimensional and, since information is highly transparent and accessible, help enterprises to both speed up business development as well as manage entrepreneurial risk more proactively. Similar to the real world business development process, this course emphasizes small business studies and entrepreneurship relative to new and established ventures that use social networking to address issues including company leadership, marketing, HR, finance, and computer information systems. Specifically, the course is designed to give students the opportunity to explore the power of new social networking strategies/tools through a series of case studies (e.g. IBM, Facebook, Google) and develop a social business strategy for an existing new venture. Students will actively explore how social networking transcends personal and professional relationships, and ultimately answer the question:  “How can social communication enhance my entrepreneurial new venture?” Prerequisite:  MGT 3120.  Students who have taken MGT 4966 or MKT 4966 prior to spring 2012 will receive credit for either MGT 4966 or MKT 4966, not both. Students who take MGT 4966 from spring 2012 onward may receive credit for both MGT 4966 and MKT 4966.

Technology, Innovation and Design in Entrepreneurship: MGT 4967 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

This course is designed to help students develop a foundation for starting and managing a technology business and taking a strategic approach to the development of technology and innovation. The course will provide a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge about the role of technology in entrepreneurship and the process of innovation and design. At the end of this course, students should have gained strong general understanding of the types of technology ventures and their start up process, and be able to identify high-potential, technology-intensive commercial opportunities and execute of these business opportunities. Other topics will include business planning, sources of capital and exit strategy, market tactics, product lifecycles, legal matters, and success-factors for technology ventures. The course will also empower students to think about innovation and technology in a strategic manner to support key components of a business at a managerial level. Conventional entrepreneurial and managerial approaches may not be as well-suited for the high-growth technology industry where a different managerial skill set is necessary. This course aims to develop these skills.

Prerequisite: MGT 3120.

Critical Conversations for Entrepreneurs – Selling and Negotiating: MGT 4968 

3 hours; 3 credits

Our ability to be successful entrepreneurs is grounded firmly in our communication skills. Successful entrepreneurs must be able to sell their ideas, products, and services, and they must be able to negotiate with clients, customers, co-workers, and funding sources. The purpose of this course is to develop one’s skill set in entrepreneurial communication through an understanding of skills and strategies in selling and negotiation. The course begins by outlining the basic elements within an entrepreneur’s communication skill set. We then delve into the psychology of selling in order to answer why people say “yes” and to learn how communication skills are the building blocks for successful business relationships. The course then focuses on developing specific skills, beginning with persuasion and influence, and then moving on to writing a successful pitch, mastering the elevator pitch, developing a business presentation, and negotiating a successful deal.

Prerequisite: MGT 3120.

 Social Entrepreneurship: MGT 4969

3 hours 3 credits

Social Entrepreneurship is the set of activities involved in creating a private or nonprofit venture with a public or social purpose. This course is designed to prepare students to better understand how social entrepreneurship fits within the larger rubric of entrepreneurship; how social entrepreneurship is unique in its purpose; and how one goes about creating and sustaining a social enterprise. Students will be guided through the process of developing a social venture. Emphasis will be placed on opportunity recognition and how a social entrepreneur refines an idea into a viable opportunity. Other topics to be covered include building an entrepreneurial team, strategic planning, business planning, competitive analysis, marketing, risk management, and financial management. The importance of accountability will be emphasized. The course will be crosslisted with the School of Public Affairs.  Prerequisite: MGT 3960 (formerly MGT 3860) or MGT 3960H or permission of the Department.

Creating Entrepreneurial Communities: MGT 4970 

3 hours; 3 credits

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the current and prospective roles of entrepreneurship in a community’s economic development with the intent of helping future entrepreneurs to understand their place in their community’s development and to assist future public policy makers to create better policy in this arena. The course begins with a history of entrepreneurship in the U.S. and of the role of entrepreneurs in building this country in both the public and private realms. It explores current practices in community economic development, their positive contributions, and their failures. It then offers an alternative approach to thinking about how entrepreneurship can become a part of a community’s culture, benefiting both entrepreneurs and the community. This course will be cross-listed with the School of Public Affairs.

Prerequisite: MGT 3960 (3860) or MGT 3960H or permission of the Department.

Women and Entrepreneurship: MGT 4971 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

This course provides an overall historical context for women as entrepreneurs and recognizes the ethnic, racial, religious and socio-economic diversity of women entrepreneurs. This course asks how gender difference impacts the experiences of women entrepreneurs versus their male counterparts. It examines the factors which motivate women to become business owners, explores the different types of entrepreneurs, and analyzes the different issues women face. Lastly, the course identifies gender specific resources and strategies that may be used to “level the playing field” for women entrepreneurs.

Prerequisite: MGT 3120.

Intrapreneurship: Managing Ventures Within the Corporation: MGT 4978
3 hours; 3 credits

This course offers students the opportunity to study the process of intrapreneurship from two perspectives. The first perspective is that of the entrepreneur working within the corporate setting. This part of the course covers the process of creating and managing a venture within a stable, possibly bureaucratic setting. The second perspective of the course is that of the corporation trying to foster the creation of a new, entrepreneurial venture within its organization. The course uses readings to cover theory and research, cases, and term projects that are presented to the class to expose the student to the issues of intrapreneurship.  Prerequisite: MGT 3960 (formerly MGT 3860) or MGT 3960H.

Special Topics in Management: MGT 4991(1 credit), 4992 (2 credits), 4993 (3 credits), 4994 (1.5 credits) 

1-3 hours; 1-3 credits

This course focuses on timely and relevant topics in management that are not covered in the regular curriculum. The areas of study are determined each semester by the instructor offering the course. The course topics and additional prerequisites will be announced during the preceding semester. Students may take this more than once provided that different topics are covered.

Prerequisite: To be determined by the syllabus.

GRADUATE REQUIRED COURSES

Entrepreneurial Strategies and Cases: MGT 9960 

3 hours; 3 credits

Presentation of conceptual frameworks to help the student in (1) identifying and describing the strategic position of the entrepreneur, (2) evaluating the entrepreneur’s past strategy and present prospects, and (3) planning the entrepreneur’s future direction so as to best match resources and opportunities. Not open to students who have completed MGT 9860.

 Analysis of Entrepreneurial Experiences: MGT 9961 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

Analysis of why and how some businesses are successful while others fail, using case studies. Lectures will focus on specific entrepreneurs and their businesses. Students will determine the characteristics, environment, and strategy required for success. Guest entrepreneurs will be invited to speak and their business ventures analyzed. Teams of two or three students will present one of the cases to the class; each student will also write an analysis of one of the other cases presented in class. The course will be organized in the following six sections: (1) from conception to start-up, (2) managing the entrepreneurial venture, (3) financial considerations, (4) managing the turnaround, (5) special issues: not-for-profit entrepreneurship and ethical/legal issues, and (6) venture valuation and exit strategies.

Pre- or co-requisite: MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860). Not open to students who have completed MGT 9862.

Managing the Family Business: MGT 9962 

3 hours; 3 credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts, models, theories, and research in the field of family business. The course offers students the opportunity to explore family business topics such as business formation, growth and expansion, strategic management, professionalization, succession, location choices, and family dynamics, conflicts, and relationships relative to the business. An overview of families who own businesses and the profiles of their businesses will be presented along with the examination of the course topics relative to the various stages of business activity, including feasibility, start-up, ongoing maintenance, expansion or redirection, and exit or transfer. The course also provides an introduction to research on family businesses by surveying the conceptual issues and methodological approaches related to the study of family business. The content of the course will include lectures, case studies, group discussion, and presentations.

Pre- or corequisite: MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860). Not open to students who have completed MGT 9867.

Researching and Developing Entrepreneurial Ventures: MGT 9963 

3 hours; 3 credits

The purpose of this course is to take MBA and MS students through the process of researching and developing a potential business venture including conceptualization, proving feasibility, research, and preparation of a detailed, realistic, and professional-level business plan. While the course will provide an overview of issues such as entrepreneurship itself and the entrepreneurial character, its main focus is on specific issues, stages, and the process that an entrepreneur must go through in developing a new business. Students either individually or in groups will meet key milestones throughout the course including developing multiple ideas, proving feasibility, researching the market, researching the competition via a detailed industry analysis, and producing a detailed business plan including resource requirement time line. The course is structured so that students present their business plans to the class for feedback and critique both in draft and final stages. The business plans, in effect, encompass two or more research projects, including a market analysis and an industry analysis.

Pre- or co-requisites: ACC 9110, MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860), and MKT 9703.  Not open to students who have completed MGT 9865.

Managing the Entrepreneurial Enterprise: MGT 9964 

3 hours; 3 credits

Day-to-day issues of managing an entrepreneurial firm, small business, family enterprise, or large privately held concern. Each entrepreneurial venture has its own unique management challenges, which the course will address through research and problem solving. Students will be expected to write a problem-solving critique of an ongoing local business or, if this is not possible, to perform the same analysis and problem solving through research.

Pre- or co-requisite: MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860). Not open to students who have completed MGT 9861.

Boards, Governance, and Leadership within Entrepreneurial and Family Firms:  MGT 9965

3 hours, 3 credits.

This course is to provide a framework for the study of best practices for boards, governance, and leadership, as well as for the establishment of Boards of Directors within entrepreneurial and family firms.  Starting and managing a high-growth/high-potential business and taking a strategic approach to the sustainability of an existing business across generations involves important decisions of governance of a company and its leadership over time.  Boards have oversight responsibility and play key roles for a company’s governance, audit, strategic plans, performance, executive leadership and compensation, succession, risk and crisis management, ethics and compliance, and major investment matters.  The selection of the appropriate corporate structure and governance system, as well as when and how to initiate a formal board and the various components and levels of governance, are vital to the growth and sustainability of most businesses, both entrepreneurial and family firms.  The course will provide a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge about the role of the board versus the management of a company and the process of professionalizing the business for growth, innovation, change and sustainability over time. Students will gain a strong understanding of board roles and responsibilities, governance, committees, structures, and leadership styles, which will lead to strong business over time.  Readings, assignments, and in-class exercises will be used to illustrate principles, stimulate discussion and foster the creative thinking necessary for the development and implementation of sound governance strategies and structures.  Simulated Board Meetings will also be enacted in class.

Prerequisite: None

 Entrepreneurship and Social Business – From Strategy Development to Implementation: MGT 9966 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

The objective of this course is to provide students with the requisite skills to expand their understanding of the importance of social communication within the development of new and existing enterprises. These social business models rely on the development of a company strategy that will help to create transparent information networks by engaging and connecting internal and external stakeholders. Specifically, the course is designed to give students the opportunity to not only explore the power of new social networking strategies/tools, but also develop and implement a social business strategy for their own entrepreneurial ventures. 3 hours; 3 credits.

Prerequisite: None. 

Technology, Innovation, and Design in High-Growth Ventures: MGT 9967 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

The purpose of this course is to provide a framework for starting and managing a high-growth/high-potential business and taking a strategic approach to the development of technology and innovation. The course will provide a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge about the role of technology in entrepreneurship and the process of innovation and design. Students will gain a strong understanding of the types of technology ventures and their start up process, identifying high growth commercial opportunities and the execution of these business opportunities. Topics such as fund-raising, investor business plans, product design, technology formulation and implementation strategies, legal matters, harnessing creativity, and success-factors for technology ventures will also be discussed. Readings, assignments and in-class exercises will be used to illustrate principles, stimulate discussion, and foster the creative thinking necessary for innovation. Conventional entrepreneurial and managerial strategies are not always the best solution for high-growth technology businesses where other approaches are needed. This course provides the framework necessary to understand these unique skills.

Prerequisite: None. 

Entrepreneurial Communications – Selling and Negotiating: MGT 9968

3 hours; 3 credits

Our ability to be successful entrepreneurs is grounded firmly in our communication skills. Successful entrepreneurs must be able to sell their ideas, products, and services, and they must be able to negotiate with clients, customers, co-workers, and funding sources. Entrepreneurial communication skills are required whether we are seeking financing from a bank, hiring a new employee, distributing work within a team, or persuading someone this is a viable idea. The purpose of this course is to develop one’s skill set in entrepreneurial communication through an understanding of skills and strategies in selling and negotiation. Entrepreneurial communication revolves around the art and science of selling and negotiating.  Therefore, the purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of selling and negotiation. The course will train students to use principled models of selling and negotiation and to better predict and assess the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in competitive situations. Students will gain a broad intellectual understanding of the central concepts in selling and negotiation. They will develop confidence in the negotiation process as an effective means for resolving conflict in organizations. Topics covered will include entrepreneurial conversations, persuasion and influence, distributive and integrative bargaining, interest based selling and negotiating, and working with multiple parties and interests.

Prerequisite: None.  Not open to students who have completed MGT 9868.

Social Entrepreneurship – Concepts and Cases: MGT 9969 

3 hours; 3 credits

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurship is the application of the tools, techniques, and skills of entrepreneurship to the achievement of a social mission (e.g., providing affordable housing to low-income households, feeding the hungry, making a college education accessible to disadvantaged youth, etc.). The course will explore the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of the field, its practice, and the ways in which its impacts are assessed. Case studies will be used extensively to illustrate principles and stimulate discussion.

Pre- or co-requisite: MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860) or departmental permission.

Entrepreneurship and Community Development: MGT 9970 

3 hours; 3 credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the current and prospective roles of entrepreneurship in a community’s economic development. It provides a guiding framework and common language for thinking about these roles and about appropriate and strategic interventions for fostering them. The course begins with an examination of current practices in community economic development regarding entrepreneurship, their attributes and their deficiencies. It then offers an alternative, systemic approach, viewing the community’s economy as a “pipeline of entrepreneurs and enterprises” at various levels of skill development and companies at differing stages of the business life cycle. It explores how entrepreneurs and their businesses advance within this pipeline and the importance of maintaining a flow of entrepreneurial activity to community wealth building. It then strategically slots major entrepreneurship-assisting tools, techniques, and programs into appropriate segments of this pipeline and demonstrates how a comprehensive, coordinated, entrepreneur-focused effort can ensure the necessary volume and flow of the pipeline in a way that can transform the community’s economy.

Pre- or co-requisite: MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860) or departmental permission.

Gender Differences Among Entrepreneurial Leaders: MGT 9971 (Hybrid course)

3 hours; 3 credits

This course asks how traditional gender difference impacts the experiences of female versus male entrepreneurs.  Historically, in the United States, the traits that are considered attractive in business leaders have a different effect on each gender.  The course examines what has been traditionally valued and expected of a business leader (corporate and entrepreneurial) in the United States and discusses different styles of leadership and management.  Students look at how society’s assumptions about work-life balance and gender stereotypes often influence the motivations and growth aspirations of entrepreneurs. Women business leaders and entrepreneurs play an active and robust role in the U.S. economy. Cases and profiles of women leaders as well as the different types of women led ventures such as high growth, lifestyle, and family business owners, are explored.  Part of the course focuses on how venture capital firms in the US evaluate and choose which high-growth businesses to fund, and why assumptions about a business owner’s gender has led to a significantly lower number of women-owned ventures receiving funding than their male counterparts. These issues are investigated while recognizing the ethnic, racial, and socio-economic diversity of American entrepreneurs. Lastly, the course requires students to conduct an assessment of their personal career goals and develop a plan which outlines how they will achieve them.  3 hours; 3 credits.  Pre- or corequisite: MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860) or departmental permission.

Real Estate Entrepreneurship: MGT 9975/RES 9980

3 hours; 3 credits

This course builds upon the core issues introduced in the fall semester’s real estate development course. It is based upon the core assumptions and theory that since large parts of real estate are necessarily entrepreneurial, more complex aspects of real estate entrepreneurship will engage the student in issues of risk evaluation at the “opportunistic” segment of investment choices and financing. Such higher-risk higher return acquisition and development options require a clear foundation in key dimensions of due diligence from both debt and equity lenders’ perspectives, as well as a clear appreciation of the ways in which deal structuring can affect the value of and stability of joint ventures engaged in high-yield investing and development.  Prerequisite: RES 9776, FIN 9776, RES 9860, or MGT 9960. Credit is given for RES 9980 or MGT 9975, not both. Not open to students who have completed MGT 9875.

 Seminar in Entrepreneurship: MGT 9979

3 hours; 3 credits

Topics of a specialized nature in the area of entrepreneurship and small business management. Current literature will be reviewed and evaluated for its theoretical value and implications for practical applications. Prerequisite: Departmental permission required.

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