NYC ‘Genetic’ Survival Kit of Character

Sabrina Smith

English 2150

Final Essay

 

                                                NYC ‘Genetic’ Survival Kit of Character

This is New York, a combat zone, and everyone has to have an angle or they’re not allowed over the bridges or through the tunnels. Let them have their angles; it’s what they live for. You got better things to worry about, like making sure the people that actually matter don’t try any funny stuff.

                                                                                    -Cynthia Heimel, playwright and author

 

            This is the city where the pot heads blow freely and cynical bigots are welcome to act out on their bigotry.  It is the land of sarcasm and opinionated rivalry that exists between one controversial individual to another.  New York City is packed with warriors ready to jump on any given opportunity, with persons equally prepared to exercise his or her full democratic rights with the utmost freedom of speech. In a nutshell, the Big Apple has no place for intimidated cowards and doubtful thinkers.   It does have room for narcissistic aristocrats and power hungry businessmen who do nothing but manhandle the island for the latest ways to make big dollars.  This land is tough; thick skin, outstanding personality and an innate understanding of the consequences of competition are the substantial requirements if there is any chance of making it.   It is wise for one to surpass Darwin’s theory of survival and establish NY’s mechanisms, for the city’s social foundation is built on the idea that it is greater than that of any other, and it is.  New Yorkers must be able to comply with such standards, no matter how complex the task may be.    Based on the words of Heimel, it is surely agreeable that the city is a war zone, but it’s not a deathly massacre.  Children of the city know nothing more than working up a good fight, but that characteristic has been genetically engineered into their personalities, for this is the hallmark of our confidence and ability to withstand anything that comes in the way of success and accomplishment.  The constant exposure of the city’s gangster atmosphere can transform the most timid individual into a lion of sorts, open clawed and ready to take on any challenge.

            It is true that a New Yorkers have to possess a level of supremacy and hard core appeal, the survival kit of character also calls for tolerance.  New Yorkers have to be able to handle the negativity that they are going to face every day of their lives.  As an aspiring journalist working for a prestigious undergraduate newspaper at one of the top CUNY colleges in New York City, I have learned to take the criticism that comes from the profession of media.  People are there to ‘bite your head off, and correct you under their standards of what is good and true.  The city is conceited; everyone has their own opinions and beliefs and when someone makes an attempt to object to them, there is going to be a sophisticated war on the hands of the city.  The prospective New Yorker has to find a way to work around that trait.  Besides, there is nothing wrong with good debating, and the upcoming city dweller will definitely benefit from a dispute among veteran city occupants.

            The most important thing to realize when trying to make it in the Great City is that one must be able to stay true to oneself, and demonstrate one’s ensemble of character.  Heimel describes this as having your own angle, and without that you cannot navigate or make it through the city.  This is a metaphoric rule for which the New Yorkers have to live by, and the same goes for the freshmen of the city.  The poetic phrase sheds light on the idea that New Yorkers have to stand guard on our ideas and personal reasoning, while staying dedicated to who they are as human persons.  For example, performers in New York City have it harder than anyone else when it comes to professions.  Their work is considered art, and many times, it is difficult to establish a career when majority do not take it seriously.  However, there is no time for doubt and there is no existence for disappointment.  The New Yorker’s ideology to overcoming tribulations is to simply try harder.  Let the urban society know who you are and what you plan to do, despite objections and oppositions.  Get up and do that scene again, because you will never ­­­­­­­see the success that you long for if you don’t even have the guts to fight for it.  I always admired the fact that New York has such versatility and diversity.  Therefore, this city should have no problem with accepting things, place and people that are different from any other location.  With that being said, there should be no issue with an individual creating their own means of thought and belief system. It is the constitutional right of living in the city.

            Making it in the city requires one more attribute, and that’s street smarts.  It is assumed that most city dwellers are fully equipped with common sense and are greatly educated, for this great place would not be the majestic utopia that it has the potential to be.  Nonetheless, anyone planning to take on a life in the city has to acquire ‘street wisdom.’  One has to converse with the local vendors, memorize street names and fall into acquaintance with popular sights, without the aid of a street map.  New Yorkers never use street maps.  One must learn to network with prominent individuals, and have the eye for talking down prices in a favorite retail store.  The New Yorker uses the city for his/her own benefit, taking advantage of the idea that it is there for progressive utility. 

            Strength, tolerance, street-sense and commitment to oneself are the major elements of surviving this great metropolis.  Without them, you might as go out and start a life in the country, waiting a thousand years for the criteria to change, if it ever does.

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An Undiscovered Genius

Sabrina Smith                                                                           Short Evaluative Blog

 

 Link: http://giornalistica.blogspot.com/

 

                                                An Undiscovered Genius

                                                (At Least in New York)

 

                                                               My Photo  http://giornalistica.blogspot.com/

 

As a young, prospective journalist it is a habit of mine to latch on to components that will assist me on this journey of becoming a great writer.  With the introduction to the blogging atmosphere (kudos to English class),  I have gotten my feet wet and now I can extend my work forward for the public to appreciate or criticize .  However, before I can challenge myself to put the blood, sweat, and tears of my linguistic labor out there, I have to have the reassurance from another individual who seems to know what he/she is doing, especially when it comes to online publishing.

His name is Giancarlo La Giorgia, a name fit for an extraordinarily unique blogger.  I am more than content with this freelance writer, for he has exposed me to another side of the art of playing with words.   His work is sarcastic and I can definitely appreciate a writer who is able to release the comical side in order to entertain the reader.  It is time to stop side-tracking and get back on the wagon with the task at hand, the blog itself.  

Giancarlo is no stranger to the blogging world.  Contrary to my experience, he has been in concordance with his blog since 2005 and has established credibility for his work in Quebec and Montreal, Canada.  Mr. Giancarlo did something amazing with his blog, that is, he took advantage of everything, including the mast head.  The reference that he makes to the typical writer’s block made me what to read more, despite the idea that he is technically not supposed to have any words on the page to be read (hence the idea of “writer’s block”).  Moving on to the remainder of the page, I noticed the profile page that he made to inform the audience about himself and his life as a freelance writer.  His personal descriptions are the epitome of solid, interactive and of course comical illustration, making it even more difficult to stray away from the page.  Following the introductory page, I went straight to the articles published on his page.  I immediately became flattered with what he wrote because it reminds me of the type of writer that I want to be in the future.  He demonstrates his news reporting skills but interestingly inserts his own anecdotal comments to liven the message of the topic.  Giancarlo made his pieces beautiful, funny and all too intriguing.  My mind thirsts for more and luckily I can navigate from story to story with ease and common sense.  He has no secret links that takes you to anything but the story that you want to view, and that is important for the reader who is in desperately in love with the blog. 

The man’s blog is simple but in a way that is entirely original.  The page is kept neat, erased of pop-up and unwanted online gimmicks that are usually waiting to latch on to a page.  I like the idea that he has his blog dedicated to a writer’s momentary “affliction” is genius and unselfish, and I comment him for that.  His blog is equipped with links to other bloggers like himself, and many of his pieces have associated pictures to heighten the humorous intentions portrayed in his word.  Through his blog I have witnessed something remarkable, and he has convinced me to step outside the boundaries of writing, and I don’t have to disturb anyone in the process.

  I have never had the chance to read and view an attention-grabbing page and I am delighted that Giancarlo has given me the opportunity to do so.  I guess I’m not so scared after all.

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Cleaning the City

Short Blog

Sabrina Smith

                                                             www.chatthills.org

                                    Metropolitan Revision

        It is hard to see the city any other way.  As a New Yorker, I could not fathom the idea of the city reinventing itself because it is genuinely incomparable to other locations.   However, if given the opportunity to improve this remarkable location, I would immediately advocate for a cleaner NYC.  I know that this recommendation seems like a cliché, but the problem tugs at my urbanized soul.  Garbage is everywhere, but it is overflowing in the streets of New York and that is something that needs to be addressed.  It is definitely nauseating to see people throw their scraps on the floor or overstuff the public garbage cans on the street corners.  The most popular thing that the human “litter bug” can do is miss the garbage can and then refuse to pick up the empty bottle lying on the ground thereafter.  The litter drives me insane and I wish the individuals of the city did more to keep the gritty streets cleaner, not only to benefit the city’s appearance but to also benefit the health of the people who occupy the city.  The same bottle that the woman forgot to pick up will eventually began a toxic element, and the problem could have been avoided, if only she took the time to do her part and get rid of it properly.  The city is our home and we, the residents, have to do all we can to make it a better place for us to live in.  

             

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An Era of Persistent Peddlers

English 2150

Sabrina Smith

 

                                                                                                                             Vendor’s Project Website

                                                                     An Era of Persistent Peddlers

 

            New York City is the gateway of urban optimism, immersed in opportunities for individuals to live life to its fullest.  The city is merciful because one is able to commit to finding a way to survive under most circumstances.  There are diligent individuals who take advantage of this characteristic, and they have become more than a mere addition to the New York community. We New Yorkers are living in hard economic times, and because of this we must dig deep with our hard core soul and have the hard knock, competitive attitude to make the most of the situation.  Vendors are the modern day hustlers who do what they have to in order to earn decent pay for themselves and their families.  Some are the fallen soldiers of the economic turnout, while others are immigrants lacking in credentials necessary for the corporate industry, but are superior in the ‘street business.’ Nevertheless, they are here, but unfortunately they have become like ghost writers, telling an inspirational story and having no byline to be credited for.  Annie Shreffler, a reporter and an advocate for the vending community states that vendors are some of the most captivating storytellers in New York City, and their stories demand to be heard. 

              The walk down the streets of New York exemplifies the avenues of hard labor.  To witness the means to which vendors obtain income along the gritty and chaotic streets of NYC is something of a revelation.   These vendors are the white and blue collar workers of la calle, except for the idea that their line of work has no room for color coordination.  The hooded sweat shirts, baggy pants and street wear represent the jostle to get things done, to have items sold and to keep customers coming back for more of their open market.  I have observed different categories of street vendors who all posses the inner desire to get by with another day’s work.   Food vendors have increased in number, offering cut-price cost to the average individual refusing to give up an arm and leg to purchase food products.   For some, it is a matter of loving the work that they do.  “I like being outdoors and talking to folks,” said the man with stand of socks and New York tees.  “I have a steady job but this helps right now, especially with the economy continuing to flip flop,” explained the optimist.  The other types of vendors are upcoming chefs and college bound kids, just trying to make a venue of future success in such a difficult society.

Most New Yorkers are fast paced, 9 to 5 workers who punch in and out of their jobs and afterwards heading home to live their own lives.  The typical New Yorker is sure of the occupational description and duties necessary to make the income that they desire.  On the contrary, the working habits of a vendor are greatly inconsistent and significantly inconvenient, regardless of the fact that they are their own bosses.  According to an article written by Charisse Jones of USA Today back in 2006, street vendors look toward long tireless hours of selling with no benefits and holidays off.  Jones speaks argues that vendors’ experiences, including climate, which provokes an uncomfortable environment for selling and is a tragic interruption for consumer spending.  Sacrifice is the backbone of this kind of business, and the vendors must be able to adapt to these harsh conditions.  Working men and women who ‘bring home the bacon’ are at an even greater struggle compared to the other unappreciated vendors.  They have their family to think about, and that makes the job more intense.  “I have children to think about; they have to eat and I have to keep the roof over their heads,” one vendor tells this concerned writer. 

            The concept of morality is something to be considered in the event that some sort of wrongdoing has been committed.    In the case of street vendors, the philosophy has reached new lows; the idea of moral treatment towards other human beings [vendors] has been disregarded.  In addition to the mean environment and sacrificial hours, vendors have no choice but to face the evil of police interrogation, public harassment and more commonly, licensing troubles. The fight for a vending license is the most important obstacle to overcome in this industry.  The offenders in the world are out to get them and they have to be prepared to defend themselves.  Writer John Sullivan’s January 2008 article of The New York Times illustrates the demonstration that vendors have went through in order to promote the lack of licenses needing for lawful vending.  One vendor speaks of the unlawful behavior in which police take possession of food products and throw them away.  Another vendor quoted in the article mentions his experience of reapplying for a license and never receiving one from the state.  It is frustrations like this that make the vending environment more stressful to work in.

Society has exposed its monstrous ways by placing vendors under the social category of mediocrity.  The vending individualists endure injustices and opposition, having to face the public with an invisible sign over their heads reading, “This is what the face of rejection looks like.”  Gratefully, there are a group of angelic people who are there to rescue these laborers of the city.

  The Street Vendor Project is an organization that seeks to obtain urban justice for all the working vendors.  The organization’s website features these individuals as a way of letting the public learn more about the underclassmen of economical productivity and their hardships.  In one of the blog videos on the site, I came upon an intriguing social experiment about a new vendor who was looking for a spot to sell her hand made smoothies.  It was truly heartbreaking to see the difficulties that this woman had to experience.  Despite the fact that she was not there to raise any conflict or start war with neighboring companies, she was given no mercy as she stood before them, hoping not to have to find another location to push her cart to.     Employees disputed with her about moving her cart to another area and threatened to call the police if she did not relocate.  The police came to shoo her off the property with a ticket and threatened to arrest her in the event that she did not move her cart from the company’s property.  This was a direct violation of her off her rights as a vendor because she had the licensable authority to be there and by law she had done nothing wrong.., It is unfortunate to see that she still had to deal with those “devil’s advocates” who wanted nothing more than to make themselves prosper in the event of her failure.  I guess that’s the evil side of the city.

  There is a moral disruption that vendors are facing on a day to day basis, for how could it be possible for these individuals to be treated the way they are?  It might be due to the idea that they are unique in their humble success, drawing people to support their honest efforts.   The full suits do not intimidate them, and I say kudos to their humble professionalism.

 In another positive outlook, it is amazing to discover that the vending community is able to look away from their issues and find a window of happiness, fun and enjoyment in their work among all of the ‘hater-ation’.  According to the project, the street vendors’ awards, also known as the Vendy Awards, is just another fun activity to bring awareness to the vending industry.  Vendors of all types and all walks of life come together and share their diversity in product but network in the effort to remain a functioning group of workers.  This is the optimistic side of vending, an attempt to stray away from all the negativity for a moment in their diligent lives and congratulate themselves for their hard work that they do for a living.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citations

Jones, Charisse. “Fines Cut Profits For NYC Street Vendors.” USA Today Online. 15 October 2006. < http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-10-15-nyc-vendors_x.htm>

Shreffler, Anne. “Making-And Losing-A Fortune on the Street.”  Food Vendor Watch Blog. 11 November 2008. < http://urbantarbell.com/Capstone/?p=5#more-5>

Sullivan, John. “Vendors Want More Permits, Not Just Green Ones.” New York Times Online. 15 January 2008. < http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/15/vendors-want-more-permits-not-just-green-ones/>

Moynihan, Colin and Chan, Sewell. “Hearing on Street Vendors Gets Heated.” New York Times Online. 14 November 2008. <http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/14/hearing-on-street-vendors-gets-heated/?apage=3

The Street Vendor Project. 13 October 2008. <http://streetvendor.netfirms.com/public_html/>

 

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Man in the Black Suit

English 2150                                                                                                   Short Post

Sabrina Smith

 

                                    The Man in the Black Suit

                                                          discovery galleries.com

 

            The word “heroin” is not one to be taken lightly.  The idea of  man to be put on a pedestal among others in the face of God is quite dangerous, and should be done with precaution.  Personally, a hero is someone that is humbly different from the common person.  Disregard any ancient comic that you may possess, for the comical definition of a hero is degrading and pointless. A mere cape and ability to fly does not demonstrate the full potential of the honorary hero.  The ability to amaze people with magic does not seem legitimate under my standards, but the one who can provide servitude and pose as an example of what it means to be a beautiful human being in this materialistic and corrupted world.   Today I had an epiphany, an intellectual revival, for as a full-blooded New Yorker, I have the opportunity to do so conveniently.  While riding the rails to get to my part time job at Starbucks Coffee Shop, I was memorized by a remarkable man.  I pushed through the overcrowded cart where I witness a gentleman in a full black suit appearing to have finished a full 9 to 5 shift on Wall Street, and was now on his way home to a possible wife and child.  Residing next him was another man, a homeless man in a wheelchair, sitting upright and confidence with only one leg by his side.

            My initial reaction was in awe.  It appeared to be an oxymoron, for there was no possible way for a suit-dressing, clean cutting man to what to have any type of contact with what some may call “the lesser” of a man.  My eyes were glued to their conversation, and the mannerisms held between one another.  It was bewildering, like the metaphorical exchange between the rich and the poor, except for the amazing fact that the rich ‘model’ was reaching out to the poor.  On this day, the man in the black suit became my personal hero.  He subconsciously stepped out of the stereotype that our society has embedded into his lifestyle.  This man represented society’s need for money, greed and power, but he pulled away from that demeanor and created something wonderful.  I can never understand why people have this tendency to evoke a persona of selfishness and indifference for others, but I was more than happy to see this man change the way I see people, New Yorkers for that matter.   He is a hero, one that unintentionally passed up society’s approval for a way to carry out the New York style and make his own presence that brought forth humility and love, and I truly appreciate it.  Thank you, man in the black suit.

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The Creative Informers

English 2150

SabrinaSmith

                                   The Creative Informers

           They say it takes a village to raise a child, but caring for the juvenile tendencies that fuse out of the city takes a special group of individuals.  They dwell among the cluttered cubicles of publishing firms and spend their days capturing the essence of the immature municipality.  Journalists fuel the city with their own kind of innovation.  It is not tangible or mediocre, for those qualities would fully illustrate the ethos of the metropolis.  These individuals contribute to the art of journalism, the written vehicle of reporting and analytical reasoning for those who are willing to follow.  New York is a place full of egotistical, outrageous, courageous, and exceptional people putting society on strings to dance for the fun of it.  Thankfully, the true journalists are there to tell the story.

            As Scottish journalist Andrew Marr is fond of saying, “News is what the consensus of what journalists determines to be.”  New York is action packed with lengths of informative and entertaining news alike.  The daily experience in the train station can reveal simple performances, where one can find a poor blind man singing with the voice of an angel to get through another day.  The visit of a celebrity on 42nd street can do more than turn the streets of Manhattan into a chaotic site.  The duty of the journalist is to be able to interpret every kind of experience and allow the reader to become a part of that experience when doing so. The city is the cultivation of diversity and unpredictable discovery.  Whether the outcome holds possibility of success or regrettable failure, journalists are there to provide the sense of objectivity to news reporting. 

            Based on the words of Colson Whitehead, the city can be personified as the supreme magnanimity, since anything lower in its court can never surpass its prominence.  There are other “so called” individuals disguised as the true artists of the craft.  They look, talk and indulge in their work like journalists, but in the presence of the real deal they are no match for the diligence and utmost dedication emitted by the Manhattan storytellers.  The urban reporter has qualifications beyond that of a commoner.  He/she must have the mastery, willingness and determination to go out into the world and take the elements in the palm of their hands.  It is with great capability that the writer takes something so indifferent and transforms it into the story of the year, receiving an even bigger recognition for such hard work. New York has the upper hand when it comes to producing great journalistic writers because it is the center of where exciting and daring bygones and foreshadows exist, creating a basis for depth and interesting assessment.

            This piece is a dedication to the assemblage of individuals who have touched the very depth of my creative soul.  They have social power, for they possess the authority to interchange any aspect of an episode that crosses the inventiveness of the city.   It has become a dream of mine to walk in the permanent shoes of the “pop artist” of the writing industry.  I find these individuals to be impeccably necessary and ideal for the progressive notion of our society.  Take a minute and imagine the ‘death’ of a newspaper, pages of knowledge destroyed with no source of explanation.  How could society then interpret the occurrences of city life?  There would be no way, and that would be unbelievably depressing.  The journalist must continue their work in order to keep the hope the documentation breathing for the life of journalism to continue.

            A journalist of New York City eats, sleeps and breathes New York, taking the time out to instill all the beautiful components of the city and bringing it into a creative retrospect.  In order for anyone to intellectually understand the ins and outs of our unique city, that person with the little workspace but a mind full of ideas will provide a remarkable insight to what they have been experiencing for most of their career.  Danish reporter, Jacob Riis, took the idea of preserving oneself in their field, and ran with it.  Riis became known for his writing because the city was his muse and resource to literary accomplishment.  According to a short biography[1], “New York City slums became his beat and his writings were the true works that helped changed the city for the better.”  The splendor of it all comes through the passion and ‘motherly instincts’ of this writer, and now the foundation of the city can be seen as some sort of extravaganza, waiting for an encore to remind it of what it’s been worth all along.

            The journalist is the human interpretation of what our city stands for.  Reporters are diverse, that is, they cover different elements that happen throughout the city, and every one of them excels at their own niche.  News writers promote the now and how of the consistent, ground- breaking changes in the city.  From the inauguration of President Obama to the report of the 150 people  from the “more than a miracle” plane landing, the news artists are there to get the scoop and inform the public about the fluctuating and developing accounts.  Another involves features, which tell about an event with an entertaining, opinion which allows both the writer and the readers to share their ideas regarding certain topics, and business that is the voice for our industrial city speaking on behalf of the ‘flopped’ economy.  Like the separate jobs of a journalist, the city has differing individuals who although do not come from the same backgrounds and traditions, share the familiar desire to live among an extraordinary environment.

            New York is on the go, and it rarely stops to take a rest.  It is the city that never sleeps, for there is far too much to be done and too little time to do so.  We New Yorkers jump on any given opportunity because we have no clue of when that lucky chance will ever come back in our favor.  The city is noisy, intrusive, hectic and ‘all over the place’ but we adore it just the same.  The same can be said for the popular writers of the journalism corporation.  We sometimes tire of their persistence and constant motion to get from story to story, questioning each individual that shows some kind of importance in the piece that they are working on.  The determination is overwhelming but we cannot help but have a high regard for what they do, and how they help not only the city but our society.  Informative artwork is never something to be taken lightly, and the work of these journalists reminds us of that thought with every issue of a newspaper or magazine that comes out. 

            It is with great pleasure that I have had the opportunity know these individuals.  I cannot recite their birthdays or every accomplishment made in their lives, but I do know that these people do more than tell a story.  They are a part of the urbanized experience, and without them, well, I guess we will never know, for there will be no one there to inform us.  My scheme as one of their successors is to continue the imminent goals that they set in motion for the future of the journalism world.

           

           


[1] www.writesite.org, an online website that carries a list of journalists who were legendary during their time.

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The Creative Informers (1st paragraph)

          They say it takes a village to raise a child, but caring for the juvenile tendencies that fuse out of the city takes a special group of individuals.  They dwell among the cluttered cubicles of publishing firms, and spend their days capturing the essence of the immature municipality.  Journalists fuel the city with their own kind of majesty.  It is not tangible or mediocre, for it would not matter to the benevolence of this metropolis.  These individuals contribute the art of journalism, the written vehicle of reporting and analytical reasoning for those who are willing to follow.  New York is the place full of egotistical, outrageous, courageous, and exceptional people putting society on strings to dance for entertainment.  Thankfully, the true journalists are there to tell the story.

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A Walk to the Urban Greenland

A Walk to the Urban Greenland

 

We New Yorkers are privileged.  We each hold a piece of the majestic city-like atmosphere, and we subconsciously forget about how good we’ve got it.  Every day is an adventure, one that is taken unexpectedly, simply because anything extraordinary is more than likely to occur.  New York is made famous with distinct idols; lady liberty looking over the people, and the Empire State building staggering among the tallest buildings, daring any and every one to make the frightening trip to the top for a better view.  We, the New Yorkers, treasure the city as our backyard, using the imagination to celebrate all the remarkable locations.

Manhattan is prominent for the busy, chaotic streets and hectic individuals driving through dumbfounding avenues looking for work or play.  Out of all the disarray, there is one location that persuades the active New Yorker to take an inevitable look at what’s going on.  The noisy construction conducted nearby cannot overtake the wonders of this landscape.  Out on Union Square, a site is strangely beautified with a touchstone, the diamond in the ruff, the Green Market.

I advise every walker to have a sense of openness and vulnerability to the capabilities of this escapade.  The unforgettable discovery of the Green Market will leave the individual skeptical, insane, as if he or she were driven into another realm. Nevertheless, one will find it hard not to unleash the curiosity within to venture through this nonnative environment.  This is where the magic begins and the real world of rational reasoning ends. 

While walking through the market, I could not formulate any idea as to why a plantation has found its way to the gritty streets of NYC.  The answer lies at the headboard of a particular goat cheese stand.  There are considerate human beings who cherish the agriculture and make an effort to spread the importance of organic alternatives to a sensible group of people, the true Manhattan dwellers.  These farmers make their way from the counties of upstate New York to the intimidating streets, humbling our society with the simplest contributions on earth.

   Following the rush of uncertainty, I could not help but be breathe-taken by all the collages of farm delights.  The stands are filled with fresh apples and fruits, eggs galore, and whole grain bread.    The foods symbolize the reflection of a lifestyle we know nothing about. The common New Yorker does not plow fields or grow grains for food; rather, we can find a local supermarket or conveniently buy groceries over the internet.  Our lives are surrounded by technology, not the wilderness.   The market represents the hard working society, and allows us to gain insight on the toughness of rural life.  The young lady selling jam of all kinds and the woman holding down the bakery stand reminds us of the simple labor that New Yorkers are unfamiliar to, for we prefer to shed sweat and tears when it comes to battling the ferocious demands of the stock market.  The farmers prefer to deal with the ‘greens’ put on the market.

            As the stroll continued down the pavements of curious passersby, I came upon a rather corky spotting.  A middle-aged African American man stood behind a stand that read “Hand Made Glass Pipes, For Legal Tobacco Use Only.”  An immediate just of incredulous thinking erupted, and the Ah-ha effect affectively overtook the mind.  Only in New York, I thought to myself.  How can something as illegal as ‘legalized’ tobaccos become an element of familiarity among New Yorkers?  Is it acceptable to pursue creativity to correspond the vulgarity of smoking trees and inhaling cocaine?  The Green Market shows the adequate righteousness to this controversial illustration.  New York is the epitome of diversity, where it comes to human beings or ways of thinking.  The city gives the ‘warm welcome’ to the unique and unjustified entities that exists in life.  New York takes the ugly mechanisms and purifies them, creating something innocent, or in this case, comical.  In another point of view, New York is the place of marketing, regardless of what you’re trying to sell.  The notion of getting by and living the American dream has to run its course.  We are privileged because we can speak, do and advocate anything that seems considerable through our democratic focal points.

            In another part of the Green Market, there stood a man offering to the public his own contributions.  With a comrade at his side, the gentleman spoke of the inspiration dispensed by the rocks, and what they meant to his peace of mind.  He told a story of their history, the comfort, and the stability that comes from these distinct and decorated fragmented stones.  These rocks are the metaphors of what New Yorkers desperately want in their lives.  The back-and-forth, up and down, and side-to-side whirlwind that New Yorkers experience becomes greatly exhausting.  Sometimes, it is best that we kick those heals up, take a deep breath, and appreciate the wonders of the city, and take into account all the measures that city life can offer. 

            The Green Market is the illustrious microcosm of what New York stands for.  It is different, diverse and greatly opinionated whether direct or indirect.   The all-natural food stands convince us that life is worth going green and New Yorkers have the choice of following that motto.  The guy and his “art” reiterate that fact that New York is never what it seems, yet it works anyway.  The gentleman and his divine rocks present the idea that despite hard and hectic times, the city and its residents can still offer hope and simplicity that is greatly attractive.  Manhattan, for me, like other New Yorkers, is an element of DNA that the urbanized cell cannot live without.  The Green Market is not just an area of distinguished buyers and sellers offering complicated and never-before-seen products.   You have to deconstruct its characteristics and look for something below the surface, an intellectual hollow ground.  This green market is here for the individualist to dig deeper into its filthy appearance and discover its grandeur.

 

 

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Hi Everyone!

This is my first blog, and it’s exciting.  I’m looking forward to sharing my thoughts and ideas with the public.

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