Podcasting and Radio News

Hidden Gems Ep. 2

This episode is all about Jaela DonMartin, an 18-year-old freshman at Baruch College who started her career as Lil Boo just 3 years ago.

Script

AMBI: Music plays for 3-4 seconds then fades out, but still in the background.

INTRO: The late Aretha Franklin once said, “Music does a lot of things for a lot of people. It’s transporting, for sure. It can take you right back, years back, to the very moment certain things happened in your life. It’s uplifting, it’s encouraging, it’s strengthening.” I’m Giselle Medina and welcome back to Hidden Gems, a podcast where we meet upcoming artists and talk about their drive in becoming well-known. 

AMBI: Music plays for 3-4 seconds then fades out.

TRACK: Jaela DonMartin is an 18-year-old freshman at Baruch College from Bushwick who started rapping around 3 years ago. I met Jaela this semester at WBMB Baruch College’s Radio Station. I didn’t know she was an artist because of how quiet and timid she is that is until one of my friends recommended her for this podcast. When I’m about to interview Jaela, she’s wearing black on black with big gold hoops, which is pretty comfortable and warm considering it’s snowing heavily this Monday morning. Then we start to talk about how she got into music.

ACT [JAELA DONMARTIN]: Um, I always wanted to be a performer since I was little. Um, I actually got into acting first before anything, so I was in like theater classes when I was younger, so I always liked performing. It was just like the transition from that to musical performance.

TRACK: Jaela made it apparent that her family has no rhythm she, however, is a very artistic person and has always loved to express herself through some form of art. 

ACT [JAELA DONMARTIN]: Like I draw, I act I do a bunch of different things, but like music was the only thing that really spoke to me and it was the only thing that I saw like people really responding to and I was, um, performing and like putting things out. So this was it. In middle school, I was playing instruments and I was performing with like instruments and stuff like that. And I just felt like I wasn’t expressing myself properly. Like I just love, I love playing music. I love music, period. Um, but I felt like I wasn’t expressing myself. So once I started writing, I can’t sing, so I’ll be writing actual songs at first and then I realized I really cannot sing. So then I found rap. So when I started rapping and I started sounding good, I was like, okay, okay. So I decided to stop performing with um rap.

TRACK: Jaela sometimes uses the studio at WBMB and she locks herself in there and you can hear a beat going and her just freestyling over it. 

ACT [JAELA DONMARTIN]: My process is different for everything. Um, sometimes I’ll have just words in my head and I’ll write it out and find a beat and like see how it fits. Other times I’ll hear a beat and like the song comes to me. It just depends like what vibe I’m going for.

TRACK: On her Youtube Channel, she not only has her own songs but her freestyles as well. Here’s a clip of her freestyle of ‘Act Up’ by City Girls.

AMBI: Freestyle of ‘Act Up’ by City Girls. 

TRACK: Jaela became Lil Boo at around 15 years old. Her first song is L’s and she shot a music video for it and everything, she even paid for it with her summer youth check. She was pretty excited about it in the beginning but looking back at it, she’s not too fond of the song anymore. Now, Lil Boo is performing all around Brooklyn and even doing small shows.

ACT [JAELA DONMARTIN]: I usually just perform in Brooklyn ‘cause that’s where most of the venues are at. I mostly like the connections I have. Um, but I performed at S.O.B.’s in Manhattan, Black Dorm Club in Queens um, do like little smaller venues. But my biggest one was at S.O.B.’s. I did the Bushwick Block Party. That was my biggest performance I had opened up for um, Cameron, CS Move all the dips that actually, um, Foxy Brown. So that was cool.

TRACK: Here’s a clip of Lil Boo’s verse off of the Ray Rav song “War” at a show in Bushwick mid-November.

AMBI: “War” fades in.

TRACK: Jaela told me that she performs at least once a month during the week and weekends. My first thought, “When does she have the time?” She’s a full-time student and the first semester of freshman year is pretty tough transition wise. So, when I asked her how do you balance both your lives, she dropped her head and eyes as if she were saying “well damn” and I could tell in her face, that it’s a lot for her. 

ACT [JAELA DONMARTIN]: Um, it’s hard, it’s really hard because I’ll be in the middle of doing an essay and then a song idea comes to my head and I’m not gonna let the song idea go. So it’s just a challenge. I don’t sleep a lot. Um, there’s sometimes where I have shows and I’m outside until three o’clock in the morning and I have to come to a 7:00 AM class the next day. So there’s no like real balance and being an artist and then coming to school, um, I just make it work. 

Do you have most of your shows on the weekends or during the week?

Um, well, a lot of the like not great shows on the weekends where it’s just like small little venues, but more like the industry performances. Like I did a couple of shows with Power 105 and those are all during the week, like Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays are usually like the day that they had those shows.

And would you say music then is your priority?

I would say music and my priority just because of the fact that I’m choosing my major in that field. So it’s like I’m not really trying to do anything else besides music.

TRACK: Despite having to juggle both her lives, Jaela loves performing and putting out music. 

ACT [JAELA DONMARTIN]: Like the most fulfilling part. Um, just like feeling everybody’s energy when I get on stage, seeing people’s reactions when I’m performing music. Um, that’s the most fulfilling part. Like of course it’s always self-fulfillment. When I finish a song, when I get out the studio and like the songs done, not hear it from like the idea I had to be in like completely done. But performing gives us like a whole ‘nother energy.

AMBI: “Levels” by Lil Boo feat. Ray Rav (play for a few seconds and leave in the background).

TRACK: About a month ago, Lil Boo released “Levels” featuring Ray Rav and this past Friday, their music video came out. 

AMBI: Fade in “Levels” by Lil Boo feat. Ray Rav for a few seconds then fade out (leave in the background).

TRACK: Thanks for listening, catch another “hidden gem” in the next episode!

AMBI: Fade in “Levels” by Lil Boo feat. Ray Rav for a few seconds.

Hidden Gems (Season 1, Episode 1)

This episode is all about George Siahaan, an 18-year-old sophomore at Baruch College who jump-started his career by just DJ-ing for WBMB Baruch College Radio.

Script

AMBI: Music plays for 3-4 seconds then fades out, but still in the background.

INTRO: In How to Stop Time Matt Haig says, “Music doesn’t get in. Music is already in. Music simply uncovers what is there, makes you feel emotions that you didn’t necessarily know you had inside you, and runs around waking them all up. A rebirth of sorts.” This is Giselle Medina and you’re listening to Hidden Gems, a podcast where we meet upcoming artists and talk about their drive in becoming well-known. 

TRACK: George Siahaan is an 18-year-old sophomore at Baruch College who jump-started his career by just DJ-ing for WBMB Baruch College Radio. When I’m about to interview George, he’s wearing a white tee with striped pants and a pink satin bandana is around his neck. It reminds me of Fred from Scooby-Doo and his ascot. He has a gold open-top single tooth cap. He tops the look with a pink Von Dutch hat and makes it a point that Kendall Jenner wore it for Drake’s Halloween party. Then we start to talk about how he became a part of WBMB. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: I saw you guys at club fair. Um, not club fair, convocation yeah. 

TRACK: To be clear, when George says “you guys” it’s because we are both a part of WBMB Baruch College’s Radio Station. I’ve known George for about a year now and though shy, he does have his moments when he’s super comfortable.

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: Yeah. Cause I saw all these other clubs. I’m not gonna diss other clubs, but like I saw all these other clubs, they’re all like business stuff. I’m like, I’m not trying to join like a business club, like a marketing frat or whatever. Like if you want to join a microFIT marketing frat that that’s cool. Like do you, but like for me personally, I, I’m already in a business school. I feel like that’s like educational enough and I was like, okay let’s, let’s do something where I’m interested in creatively. So I saw Encounters, I saw The Ticker and I saw the radio station and I was like, Oh these guys DJ BET.

TRACK: George is from Indonesia, he came to America five days before his orientation in late August of last year. His love for music comes from how he was raised. George and his family are from a particular culture in Indonesia called Batak.

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: Like stereotypically Batak people are really good at music they can sing and stuff like that so I guess it stems from there like my mom plays piano my dad tries to play instruments my whole entire family sings – oh I like this song too – 

TRACK: George and I are in the radio station and outside in the main area of WBMB one of the members, Simba is practicing one of his DJ sets. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: When I was 13 no when I was like 11 I told my parents I wanted to DJ and then they laughed at me look – laughs/chuckles – look at what happened now I’m a fucking DJ but um yea so I started music I started producing like 12ish on a shitty laptop. I’ve always had a fascination for like djing ‘cause people think it’s just pressing buttons and stuff but I always thought there was more to djing because it’s more of curating a vibe and I knew that at like 12 but my parents didn’t let me because they wanted me to be a doctor as all Asian parents do.

TRACK: Here’s a clip of George Dj-ing at Baruch College’s Club Fair this September.

AMBI: George DJing at Club Fair

TRACK: Being a DJ for WBMB has allowed George to get noticed by different people and he has been approached to DJ at multiple parties. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: Supreme Carl, See No LIfe, I’ve done some shit in Indonesia, um but mostly most of my gigs come from doing school stuff ‘cause um that’s usually a once every 2 weeks thing um but I enjoy it when people aren’t rowdy and ask for stupid music requests by the way like I really hate song requests, I think all DJs do too that’s like how you don’t snap at a waiter. 

TRACK: When George does his sets it’s usually Afro House or Baile House. In all honesty, I had no idea what this was, I knew it was a genre of music and that Afro House is from Africa, Baile House is from Brazil/South American. I had to text George later that night to give me some examples. And here they are 

AMBI: This is Baile: https://soundcloud.com/alexguesta/alex-guesta-kayamba-vs-magalenha-cut

AMBI: This is Afro House: https://soundcloud.com/ikonika/afro-b-x-hhb-drogba-x-reign-ikonika-blend 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: I’ll play hip hop but if I know it’s like the audience is kind of niche and they’re kind of like you know I wouldn’t say educated but they’re open to other music then I’ll play my House music because that’s what I’m most comfortable with and that’s what I enjoy doing most. 

TRACK: As I kinda mentioned before, George does rap. I asked him what his process in making a song and he said that he wasn’t the best person to ask.  

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: I’ve always loved music, I always told myself I wanted to rapper ok so I wanted to be a rapper at the beginning because when I was in Indonesia there was a bunch of these Indonesian people making hip hop songs but their English was trash right 

TRACK: (fade out) I asked him what his process in making a song and he said that he wasn’t the best person to ask and I guess this is why. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: like super bad like fresh off the boat bad I’m serious bro and I was like “and these guys are getting like 30 million views, they’re getting TV-like like performances and stuff like bro I can do this right?” So then I wanted to make a diss track on them but I didn’t thank God but I just started writing this one song it’s called Narauto uh the hook the hook is is like pretty like ok so the song is about my depression and how much I wanna kill my self but people didn’t get that it was awful double entendres but I feel like if I tell people that, they’ll think I’m lying but it is what it is uh so that’s kind started – what was the question again? What was the process right so um what people usually do um they’ll usually look for a free beat 

TRACK: (fade out) It was moments like these I think that George would get excited about talking about his music that he’ll just continue talking. I think he’d just elaborate on things until he got to the endpoint. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: and then they’ll start writing to that that’s what I did ‘cause I didn’t think I was gonna put it on streaming services but writing it took me about I’m not gonna lie it took me 20 minutes I recorded it that night at my friend’s place and I put it on soundcloud and then within like it got like a 1000 views like really quick and I was like “oh ok BET imma put this on spotify but what I didn’t read was that if you take a beat from youtube and it says free its not free free it’s free for non profit and if I put it on spotify I can get profit right so I put it on spotify and then I got profit and then I was like “oh I can get sued for this” so I had to take it down but I’m not gonna say what I did with the money – What was the question again?

Me: What is your process?

AMBI: Music comes in again for 3-4 seconds but fades out (still in the background)

TRACK: Sometimes George would go off on tangents and at one point I had to ask him if there were certain things that he comfortable with me using because he’d talk about very serious and personal things. I think it’s because George and I are friends and he’s comfortable with me but I wanted to make sure that he wasn’t gonna be blind sighted. Here’s another example:

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: Ary said that I look sad 24/7 and I don’t know how I feel about that. Maybe I do look sad all the time, I’m sad like 22/7, not 24/7 The two hours that I get sleep. Oh no, bro. I had the weirdest dream last night. I cried afterwards. I don’t want to talk about it. And it’s too, it’s too deep. You know what? I realized I don’t like talking about my feelings and I feel like that’s why I’m making music. You can use this part, you have a question? Well, did I answer your question?

Me: Actually I have not asked a question.

George: I’ve been, I’ve just been talking for the past 15 minutes.

Me: You’ve just been rambling. Well, you’ve been going off on a tangent. I’m not going to say rambling, but you’ve been, it’s like a stream of consciousness that you’re doing, that you’ve been doing and I’ve just let you talk.

George: Thank you. 

Me: You’re welcome. 

AMBI: Music comes in again for 3-4 seconds but fades out (still in the background)

TRACK: Let’s get back to the music part of George. His stage is name is YG JUJU, at one point he says that his rapper persona is his polar opposite. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: Not wanting to be, but it’s more of like a no sort of want. It’s more of like, it’s just the opposite of what I actually do. It’s not what I want to be, but

Me: What, you aspire to be?

George: No, cause I don’t aspire to like the lyrics that I say. Sometimes they’re like, I shouldn’t have said that. That type of stuff like that. Like that’s, that’s overly aggressive. Yeah, but like, then again, that’s like, you know, it’s like Beyonce has Sasha Fierce, you know what I mean? Like that Sasha fierce isn’t Beyonce, but it’s in Beyonce’s body like the same thing as like a lot of the music, well, the two songs I put out, it’s all about like taking like this girl, this boyfriend, this, this dudes that girlfriend, right? Like, bro, I can’t do that. The moment I find like a girl as a boyfriend, I’m dipping, you know what I’m saying? 

TRACK: George then went all philosophical on me on his two personalities. 

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: It’s like, it’s like in psychology you have like Id ego, super ego. I think the Id is like, like when you’re a baby, like your, your desire. Like when you’re a baby, you love your mom so much that you’d kill your dad, but you can’t obviously because you’re a baby. But like, it’s sort of like my rapper persona is like my Id. Wow. That’s crazy. Yo. That I should, wow. I gotta use that some time, bro. My rapper persona is my Id, I think it’s called the Id by the way.

AMBI: Music comes in again for 3-4 seconds but fades out (still in the background)

TRACK: I looked this up online and according to Sigmund Freud’s model of the psyche, the id is the impulsive (and unconscious) part of our psyche which responds directly and immediately to basic urges, needs, and desires. The id is not affected by reality, logic or the everyday world, as it operates within the unconscious part of the mind. So I’m guessing it checks out. 

AMBI: Snippet of Act Out for 3-4 seconds fade out, but still in the background until the end

TRACK: YG JUJU just came out with his song Act Out – available on Spotify and Apple Music.

ACT [GEORGE SIAHAAN]: I made that, um, because I wanted to impress a girl. Uh, she had a boyfriend, so I wanted to make a song about stealing her from the boyfriend, but it was kind of like violent, not, not violent towards her. It’s just like, it’s, it’s pretty like aggressive. It’s literally about me taking like TYB, you know what I’m saying? But yeah, I just want it to get on her playlist. So what I did was I went to my friend’s house, he was making music. Um, they’re, they’re, they’re pretty popping into in Indonesia I guess. Um, uh, what was I saying? Yeah. So he was like, cause I was taking like a music hiatus. I was like, I’m done with this music stuff. Like this is going nowhere. I’m just gonna start DJing. And he was like, bro, just like produce something. So I made this beat in like five minutes and he was like, go freestyle over it. So I freestyled over it. And then I was like, “Oh, this is kind of fire actually.” 

TRACK: Thanks for listening, catch another “hidden gem” in the next episode!

Final Narrative Podcast Pitch

For the Narrative Podcast I️ would like to go back to the Washington Business Improvement District.

For the first podcast I️ would like to interview the people that work there (I️ believe there’s around 4-5). I️ want to get more into the BID’s work ethic and the plans for Washington Heights.

For the second podcast, I’m not really sure what it’s going to be on. Hopefully when I️ go to get interviews it would lead me to another story. I️ know that there’s a website/facebook profile against the BID so maybe that can be the second but I’d have to investigate that further.

Just a Small Taste of Uptown

Script of Just a Small Taste of Uptown

HOST INTRO: Washington Heights is a neighborhood in the northern portion of New York City and a predominately Hispanic neighborhood. Starting October 7th until October 17th, 40 restaurants will be participating in Uptown Restaurant Week hosted by Washington Heights Business Improvement District. Giselle Medina went to Washington Heights to investigate. 

AMBI: Street sounds of 181st – can hear some buses, cars, and people singing 

TRACK: This is Giselle Medina and I am walking on 181st Street. There are multiple vendors trying to sell fruit and Spanish music is coming from just about everywhere. Washington Heights is a pretty bustling neighborhood with buses constantly driving by, but that’s not all, they also have a large Restaurant and Lounge industry. The Washington Heights Business Improvement District also known as the BID is hosting their very first Uptown Restaurant Week, starting on October 7th. 

AMBI: Yuby picks up the phone, “Good Afternoon this is Yuby at the Washington Heights BID” 

TRACK: Yuby Hernandez is the program manager at the BID. She wants Washington Heights to be seen in a different light and show off how vibrant of a community it is as well as what it has to offer. 

ACT [YUBY HERNANDEZ]: A lot of our restaurants people don’t think about them as being ”high quality” or being really exciting by offering restaurant week we hope to get people to come in and really think about “Oh this restaurant is actually really great” “Oh this is really, they have really great services, it’s a really great experience” “ Oh yea I do love this neighborhood.” 

TRACK: The BID did a study of all the industries in Washington Heights and Inwood where they noticed that the biggest industry is the Restaurant and Lounge industry. 

ACT [HERNANDEZ]: We had a brainstorming meeting and we came up with a list of around 60 restaurants that we wanted to invite and so a lot of the list started with of course the 22 that participated in the Taste of Uptown.

TRACK: Taste of Uptown was a free food festival that took place this past June. 22 restaurants participated at the festival that had over 500 people attend including all of the local elected officials.

ACT [HERNANDEZ]: That was a really great celebration of what the community is and then so this way is a great way to engage Restaurant Week to have those people who participated in that event to continue to taste our restaurants, to continue to have opportunities for them to do things with their families so it’s just a fun way to get people to reinvest in their community and to you know try something new.

TRACK: After coming up with their list of restaurants, the BID went tried to recruit them; however, not all of them could participate. 

ACT [HERNANDEZ]: Some restaurants couldn’t participate because their offerings are less, a couple other restaurants said they weren’t interested they said “oh that’s our busy season, we can’t offer discounts because that’s when we make all of our money”

TRACK: Not all the participants are restaurants, there are few cafes that are doing their own spin on Uptown Restaurant Week to show that not everything has to be a “sit down dinner”.

ACT [HERNANDEZ]: Bizcocho De Colores, they are a cake supply store and bakery and they also are doing specials for the week of Restaurant Week and they are going to offer discounts on their cakes, discounts on their coffee, and desserts and things like that.

AMBI: Atmosphere of Bizcocho De Colores

TRACK: Stacey Lebron is the manager of the family-owned cake supply store, Bizcocho De Colores, and hopes that by being a part of Uptown Restaurant Week they can become more known and gain more clients.

ACT [STACEY LEBRON]: So every order over $100 receives 12 free cupcakes or a tres leche and we just like to support anything that’s related to the community really like uptown and for people to just taste our tres leche and cupcakes and for them to know that we offer other things besides cakes. 

TRACK: Uptown Restaurant Week is one of the ways the BID is promoting the community. 

ACT [HERNANDEZ]: And so the BID is collaborating with Small Business Services and with the Inwood Merchant Association because Inwood has a ton of different businesses that are not just restaurants and so they are all helping us promote the series of events because you know it’s not one day through by putting up posters, by giving out postcards, and it’s really a community event people are excited for it people want to engage and so we think that we are going to be really successful. 

AMBI: Street sounds of 181st – can hear some buses, cars, and people singing

TRACK: Washington Heights is a very lively community which Yuby Hernandez wants to showcase during this week. She wants to change the reputation of the neighborhood and knows that this event will help do just that. For Baruch College, this Giselle Medina in Washington Heights, New York.

 

Just a Small Taste of Uptown

By Giselle Medina

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, NEW YORK – The Washington Heights Business Improvement District also known as the BID is hosting their very first Uptown Restaurant Week, starting from October 7th until October 17th, around 40 restaurants will be participating.

A predominately Hispanic neighborhood, Washington Heights is located in the northern portion of New York City. It is a bustling neighborhood with buses constantly driving by as well as multiple vendors trying to sell fruit and Spanish music is coming from just about everywhere. Washington Heights also has a large Restaurant and Lounge industry. 

Yuby Hernandez is the program manager at the BID. She wants Washington Heights to be seen in a different light and show off how vibrant of a community it is as well as what it has to offer. She says, “A lot of our restaurants people don’t think about them as being ”high quality” or being really exciting by offering restaurant week we hope to get people to come in and really think about “Oh this restaurant is actually really great” “Oh this is really, they have really great services, it’s a really great experience” “ Oh yea I do love this neighborhood.”” 

The BID did a study of all the industries in Washington Heights and Inwood where they noticed that the biggest industry is the Restaurant and Lounge industry. Uptown Restaurant Week is not the first time the BID has promoted this industry. 

Taste of Uptown was a free food festival that took place this past June. Twenty-two restaurants participated at the festival that had over 500 people attend including all of the local elected officials. “That was a really great celebration of what the community is and then so this way is a great way to engage Restaurant Week to have those people who participated in that event to continue to taste our restaurants, to continue to have opportunities for them to do things with their families so it’s just a fun way to get people to reinvest in their community and to you know try something new,” says Hernandez. 

After coming up with their list of restaurants, the BID went and tried to recruit them; however, not all of them could participate. Hernandez says, “Some restaurants couldn’t participate because their offerings are less, a couple other restaurants said they weren’t interested they said “oh that’s our busy season, we can’t offer discounts because that’s when we make all of our money.””

Not all the participants are restaurants, there are few cafes that are doing their own spin on Uptown Restaurant Week to show that not everything has to be a “sit down dinner.” One example is Bizcocho De Colores, a cake supply store and bakery that will be offering specials throughout the week. “So every order over $100 receives 12 free cupcakes or a tres leche. We just like to support anything that’s related to the community really like uptown and for people to just taste our tres leche and cupcakes and for them to know that we offer other things besides cakes,” says Stacey Lebron, the manager of the family-owned cake supply store.

Uptown Restaurant Week is one of the ways the BID is promoting the community. Hernandez says, “The BID is collaborating with Small Business Services and with the Inwood Merchant Association because Inwood has a ton of different businesses that are not just restaurants and so they are all helping us promote the series of events because you know it’s not one day through by putting up posters, by giving out postcards, and it’s really a community event people are excited for it people want to engage and so we think that we are going to be really successful.”

Washington Heights is a very lively community that Yuby Hernandez wants to showcase during this week. She wants to change the reputation of the neighborhood and knows that this event will help do just that.

Podcast #2

For the next podcast, I would like to do it on Sprinkles the cupcake bakery located on 780 Lexington. The bakery has recently changed managers and the new managers are trying to rebuild the bakery. Last year, Sprinkles had the ATM cupcake machine which closed down about a year ago and every now and then people will come in and ask about it since it’s still on the list of things to do when in New York.

I want to interview two of the new managers about their plans for Sprinkles and one of the workers that have been there for a few years (I believe there’s one or two).

Podcast Pitch

For my podcast, I am going to interview the general manager of WBMB (Baruch’s Radio Station). We are going to discuss the importance of having a radio station as well as the day to day activities of being in charge of it.

Podcast: In the Dark

https://www.apmreports.org/in-the-dark/season-one 

The podcasts I focus on are mystery/true crime podcasts. The first season of the podcast In the Dark is 10 episodes and explores the abduction/murder of Jacob Wetterling (an 11-year-old boy) in rural Minnesota. Wetterling’s case went unsolved for 27 years until his remains were discovered on September 1st, 2016 which was revealed by Dan Heinrich, who also admitted to the crimes. APM Reports and reporter Madeleine Baran reveal how, as Baran puts it, “Jacob’s kidnapping was a huge deal here, it changed the way people parented children. It made kids afraid to go outside at night and it even led to a federal law that requires all states to maintain registries of sex offenders.” The first season was released in September 2016 with an update in 2018 of the Stearns County sheriff who provided detail of his predecessors’ faults. 

The podcast is a combination of scripted and host interviews. The format goes with some clips of T.V. or radio reports of the case during that time then, Baran speaks for a while or does an interview. Throughout the episodes, she has around 3-4 interviews (parents, friends, Dan Heinrich, FBI agents). Since it is a crime podcast, it’s best to listen from the beginning – after Baran introduces those who helped with the creation of the podcast (producer, editors, etc.), she states to go back to the first episode to understand it. It’s just straight investigative journalism, no advertising which I really like since the podcast had me hooked from beginning to end. 

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