ELL (English Language Learner) Courses


ELL First-Year Writing Courses

ENG 2100T: Writing I and ENG 2150T: Writing II

All students at Baruch are required to take ENG 2100 and ENG 2150 as part of the Required Core of Pathways General Education. For many years, Baruch has offered ELL (English Language Learner) versions of the two courses, titled ENG 2100T and 2150T (T representing “tutorial” for extra time and attention). It’s important to note that the courses are not for weaker students but rather provide additional classroom time and lower course caps to support students whose first language isn’t English.

Just like ENG 2100 and 2150, ENG 2100T and ENG 2150T satisfy the “English Composition” requirement of the Pathways Required Core. As with ENG 2100 and 2150, students receive three (3) hours of course credit for ENG 2100T and ENG 2150T.

Differences between “T” and “non-T” first-year writing courses:

  • Extra class time: To give students extra time to develop their skills in written English, ENG 2100T and 2150T meet for six (6) hours per week rather than four (4) as do ENG 2100 and 2150.
  • Fewer students and extra attention: Lower course caps (20 per section) provide ELL students numerous opportunities to write and receive feedback on their writing in English.
  • Specially trained faculty: Students in T courses also benefit from faculty who are specially trained in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

Placement: Students are placed into ENG 2100T after completing Baruch’s Online Writing Placement (OWP). The OWP outlines the differences between T and non-T writing courses, asks students which they feel would best serve their learning, and asks them to write a short essay to provide a writing sample. The writing sample and student input are reviewed by faculty at Baruch who teach First-Year Writing courses, and students are placed into ENG 2100 or ENG 2100T based on this review.

Students also may be placed into a T version of First-Year Writing based on the recommendation of their instructor and the EAL (English as an Additional Language) Director, Dr. Kamal Belmihoub in the Department of English. Students who want to discuss their placement should email Dr. Belmihoub at Kamal.Belmihoub@baruch.cuny.edu.

 

Learning Outcomes 

ENG 2100T

After completing ENG 2100T you should be able to:

  • Critically analyze texts in a variety of genres: Analyze and interpret key ideas in various discursive genres (e.g. essays, news articles, speeches, documentaries, plays, poems, short stories), with careful attention to the role of rhetorical conventions such as style, tropes, genre, audience and purpose.
  • Compose within academic writing contexts: Apply rhetorical knowledge in your own composing using conventions appropriate for academic writing contexts.
  • Identify and engage with credible sources and multiple perspectives in your writing: Identify sources of information and evidence credible to your audience; incorporate multiple perspectives in your writing by summarizing, interpreting, critiquing, and synthesizing the arguments of others; and avoid plagiarism by ethically acknowledging the work of others when used in your own writing, using a citation style appropriate to your audience and purpose.
  • Compose as a process: Experience writing as a creative way of thinking and generating knowledge and as a process involving multiple drafts, review of your work by members of your discourse community (e.g. instructor and peers), revision, and editing, reinforced by reflecting on your writing process in metacognitive ways.
  • Use conventions appropriate to audience, genre, and purpose: Adapt writing and composing conventions (including your style, content, organization, document design, word choice, syntax, citation style, sentence structure, and grammar) to your rhetorical context.

ENG 2150T:

After completing ENG 2150T you should be able to:

  • Critically analyze texts in a variety of genres: Analyze and interpret key ideas in various discursive genres (e.g. essays, news articles, speeches, documentaries, plays, poems, short stories), with careful attention to the role of rhetorical conventions such as style, tropes, genre, audience and purpose.
  • Use a variety of media to compose in multiple rhetorical situations: Apply rhetorical knowledge in your own composing using the means of persuasion appropriate for each rhetorical context (alphabetic text, still and moving images, and sound), including academic writing and composing for a broader, public audience using digital platforms.
  • Identify and engage with credible sources and multiple perspectives in your writing: Identify sources of information and evidence credible to your audience; incorporate multiple perspectives in your writing by summarizing, interpreting, critiquing, and synthesizing the arguments of others; and avoid plagiarism by ethically acknowledging the work of others when used in your own writing, using a citation style appropriate to your audience and purpose.
  • Compose as a process: Experience writing as a creative way of thinking and generating knowledge and as a process involving multiple drafts, review of your work by members of your discourse community (e.g. instructor and peers), revision, and editing, reinforced by reflecting on your writing process in metacognitive ways.
  • Use conventions appropriate to audience, genre, and purpose: Adapt writing and composing conventions (including your style, content, organization, document design, word choice, syntax, citation style, sentence structure, and grammar) to your rhetorical context.