Mentor FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions from prospective and current EOC mentors

 General questions before applying to become a Mentor

  Mentors already in the Academic Year-Long Program


What is Executives on Campus?

Executives on Campus (EOC) is a department at Baruch College that provides undergraduate and graduate students from all three Baruch Schools (the Zicklin School of Business, the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences and the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs) with Mentors who help with networking, interviewing and other essential soft skills to make Baruch students competitive in today’s job market. EOC is also a community and network of mentors, mentees, and mentee alumni. EOC is unique to Baruch; no organization such as this exists in other colleges.

(back to top)

Who is a mentor?

EOC Mentors are experienced executives (some are Baruch alumni) who volunteer their time to advise and help mentees define and achieve their career goals by supporting, counseling and serving as role models for the mentees. Mentors may serve as a friend and advocate to their mentees in addition to assisting and advising in their career development.

(back to top)

Who is a mentee?

Mentees in the EOC’s mentoring programs are Baruch students (graduate and undergraduate) who have a serious desire to develop themselves professionally and personally; who are aware that in today’s job market soft skills are essential because very often they make or break a career regardless of one’s technical skills and academic education. Mentees are committed and mature students who are open-minded to learning as much as possible from more experienced professionals across a wide range of industries, who have been in the working world for a lot longer and have a great deal of advice and support to give.

(back to top)

What is the Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program?

EOC’s Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program is a professional partnership between Baruch students and their EOC mentors. It is open to undergraduate* and graduate** students based upon their graduation year. This year’s program is open to current Baruch students graduating in 2021. The official mentorship starts in September and lasts through May; however, if the mentor and mentee wish, they may keep in touch after the official mentorship concludes.

The program is a commitment: the mentor and mentee must meet face-to-face at least once a month and maintain regular contact via email or telephone. Both the mentor and mentee must check in with the EOC office once a semester and attend all of the mandatory EOC workshops, orientations, and events that are a part of the program. It is not the goal of the program, nor is it expected of mentors to provide their mentees with an internship or a job, and mentees in the program may not ask their mentors for an internship or a job.

Undergraduate students applying for the program must hold a minimum 3.0 GPA.
Graduate students who enrolled in Spring 2019 or Fall 2019.

(back to top)

Why do mentors volunteer?

EOC mentors volunteer out of a genuine interest in helping students develop professionally and personally. Mentoring offers a way to give back, to do something good for another person. Many mentors see themselves in their mentees; they have had similar career trajectories and faced some of the same challenges as their mentees and want to help.

(back to top)

Why do students need a mentor?

Everyone benefits from the guidance of a more experienced Mentor, especially in today’s tough and competitive job market—every little bit helps, and having a Mentor helps a lot. While Baruch College provides an outstanding academic and technical education, and the career services on-campus offer excellent career management tools, having a dedicated academic year-long Mentors is an invaluable enhancement to students’ academic and professional development.

Mentors provide exceptional learning experiences for their mentees; they have the ability to lead, inspire and motivate their mentees by expanding their mentee’s awareness, insight and perspective. Mentors from all industries can be beneficial to a mentee’s growth; they do not have to be in the same exact industry to support and guide others. Mentors:

  • Provide professional perspective: insight about industry, corporate culture, networking, marketing oneself
  • Give constructive feedback on resumes, cover-letters, interview prep and debriefing, and any other topic in a stress and judgment-free environment
  • Are a sounding board for ideas
  • May become an advocate and colleague for life

(back to top)

Who participates in Executives on Campus Mentoring Programs?

Experienced executive volunteers who have a genuine interest in mentees’ professional and personal development along with Baruch students (graduate and undergraduate) who have a serious desire to develop themselves professionally and personally; who are aware that in today’s job market interpersonal skills are essential because often times they make or break a career regardless of one’s technical skills and academic education; committed and mature students who are open-minded to learning as much as possible from more experienced professionals across a wide range of industries, who have been in the working world for a lot longer and have a great deal of advice and support to give.

Our Mentors have at least 7 years’ of professional experience with at least three years’ of managerial experience. They are leaders in business, government, non-profit from the New York City metropolitan area and beyond.

(back to top)

Who qualifies to be a mentor in the Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program?

  • 7+ years of work experience inclusive of 3+ years management and/or supervisory experience*
  • College degree
  • Track record or demonstrated interest in developing young people
  • Broad business experience, including being up-to-date on the latest business trends in the Mentor’s industry

Additional Requirements for Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program:

  1. Time to dedicate at least one hour per month for face-to-face mentoring
  2. Ability and willingness to encourage mentee to actively participate in the relationship
  3. Must respond to once per semester progress report/check-ins to EOC office

*Exceptions to the criteria are determined on a case-by-case basis

All mentors must adhere to the:  Baruch Code of Ethics

(back to top)

How long is the commitment?

The Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program runs from September to May (it coincides with the academic year). However, depending on the rapport, some mentors and mentees continue their relationship and keep in touch well after the program ends.

*ZUHP mentors work with their mentees for up to two academic years.

(back to top)

What do I talk about with my mentee?

The Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program is a partnership that requires work and commitment from both you and your mentee. As a mentor, you are a valuable resource for your mentee and can greatly contribute to his/her professional development. Mentees should maximize meetings with their mentor and are expected to come prepared with topics for discussion and goals that they are working towards, along with any updates on their progress.

Throughout the mentorship, it is important that you follow-up and provide feedback on any assignments you give your mentee and any progress they have made towards achieving their goals. In addition to working on concrete objectives, mentees are encouraged to take the opportunity to discuss current trends in business, markets, culture, travel, as well as discuss upcoming lectures and events that both you and your mentee could attend.

(back to top)


How often do I meet with my mentee?

Face-to-face meetings are a vital part of the Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program and so mentors and mentees are required to meet in-person at least once per month. Mentors and mentees are also expected to keep regular contact via email or phone.

(back to top)

What should I do at the first meeting with my mentee?

After the matches are made, your mentee is responsible for setting up your first meeting. The initial meeting with your mentee will set the tone and establish expectations and goals for the mentorship. Depending on the chemistry between you and your mentee, future meetings may be more or less formal. However, structure is beneficial to many mentees and receiving ‘assignments’ from their mentors helps them achieve their goals.

At your first meeting:

  • Tell your mentee about yourself and ask about their background, interests and goals
  • Encourage your mentee to come prepared to all future meetings to maximize your time together
  • Discuss the best ways to communicate with one another between your scheduled monthly meetings
  • Establish the goals and expectations for the mentorship with your mentee
  • Ask your mentee to discuss 2 or 3 topics that they would like to focus on, such as relevant aspects of their background, career goals, and job search activity to date

(back to top)

What should I talk about with my mentee?

The Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program is a partnership that requires work and commitment from both you and your mentee. As a mentor, you are a valuable resource for your mentee and can greatly contribute to his/her professional development. Mentees should maximize meetings with their mentor and come prepared with topics for discussion and goals they are working towards, along with any updates on their progress.

Throughout the mentorship, it is important that you follow-up and provide feedback on any assignments you have given your mentee and any progress they have made towards achieving their goals. In addition to working on concrete objectives, mentees are encouraged to take the opportunity to discuss current trends in business, markets, culture, travel as well as discuss upcoming lectures and events that you could both attend and benefit from.

(back to top)

What can I help my mentee with?

Your mentee is focused on his/her professional development. To contribute to this, as a mentor you can:

  • Offer feedback on his/her current job search by reviewing resumes, cover letters, and job applications
  • Conduct practice interviews
  • Help develop communication and networking skills
  • Provide a professional insight on careers, industries, business etiquette and corporate culture
  • Encourage and support him/her in creating a personal brand

*Please note that mentors are not expected to provide their mentees with job or internship opportunities, and mentees are not allowed to ask their Mentor for a job, internship or access to their mentor’s contacts.

(back to top)

Where do I meet with my mentee?

Mentors and mentees understand that the Academic Year-Long Mentoring Program is a professional relationship. Mentors and mentees may meet at the mentor’s office, on  campus, or at a coffee shop.  EOC also offers a quiet room on campus (The EOC Room), which can be booked here.

(back to top)

What if I get matched with a mentee outside my area/industry?

The objective of the program is to connect mentees with professionals from all areas, to network and build relationships that ultimately will help the mentee develop professionally and personally.

The program offers mentees the opportunity to get out of their comfort zone. Mentees are able to practice in a safe environment for later situations in the real world, learn about additional perspectives and new experiences, gain value in knowing people with more life/work experience that can be useful across industries, and have insight on corporate cultures and successful branding.

Mentors are valuable to the growth and the development of the mentee even if they do not share the same industry. The pure concept of networking is to be open and connect with and many different people as possible because a person’s career development is never a straight line.

(back to top)

What do I do if I am having a problem with my mentee? What do I do if my mentee does not respond to my emails/phone calls?

It is the mentee’s responsibility to be proactive in maintaining contact with his/her mentor. Both Mentors and Mentees are informed that they are required to keep regular contact with one another.

If you are experiencing difficulties with your Mentee or are having trouble contacting your Mentee, do not hesitate to inform the EOC office at executivesoncampus@baruch.cuny.edu. We are here for you to help you make the most out of the program. We will gladly reach out to your mentee and facilitate contact between you. Although it is up to the mentee to be proactive and reach out, sometimes they are shy or overwhelmed and need encouragement. It is helpful for the mentor to check in with the mentee if they have not been in touch recently.

(back to top)

What if my schedule or circumstances change and I can no longer honor my commitment to the program and my mentee?

We understand that circumstances can change and affect your availability. If you can no longer meet the requirements of the program, please contact the EOC office at ExecutivesOnCampus@baruch.cuny.edu as soon as possible so that we can make other arrangements for your mentee.

(back to top)

What resources are available to me and my mentee?

Mentors aren’t expected to know the answers to every question the mentee asks. Please take advantage of the community of mentors at Baruch and feel free to pass along questions or concerns to the EOC office. For more information/resources, click here to jump to Resources page.

EOC Office
We are located in the 17 Lexington Building, Room 1608/10.

General inquiries: ExecutivesOnCampus@baruch.cuny.edu | p: 646.660.6127

EOC Newsletter
If you would like to contribute a news item or article, please contact the EOC office at ExecutivesOnCampus@baruch.cuny.edu.

Access the Directory

 

(back to top)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *