Blogging the News

News Roundup: In the Asian Community

November 19th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on News Roundup: In the Asian Community

  • Sephora’s been recently slapped with a lawsuit after deactivating thousands of Asian customers’ accounts following their 20% off sale, charged for racial e-profiling. [The Daily News] 
  • The man responsible for the fatal death of an Asian man pushed onto the tracks in New York City, was arrested earlier this week. [The Guardian]
  • Chinatown buses are under investigation for ‘gun ring’ trafficking. [The New York Post]
  • A nonprofit advocacy group is suing Harvard and the University of North Carolina over allegations that the schools illegally limited admissions for qualified Asian American applicants. [Bloomberg Businessweek]

Meanwhile, on the other side of the world…

  • Hong Kong protestors are getting restless and violent. [CNN]
  • Five Thai students get detained for the “Hunger Games” salute. [BBC News]

Tags: Uncategorized

Millennial Voices: Asian Traditions Explained

November 9th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on Millennial Voices: Asian Traditions Explained

As you may know, there are certain traditions, or rather, superstitions in the Asian culture. I went around the Baruch community and asked some millennial Asian Americans to share some of the common traditions that they practice at home, things like taking off their shoes before entering someone’s home or traditional dishes they like to eat. Here are some their responses.

Some of these traditions required further explanation, for instance, why shouldn’t you be able to give someone a nice pair of shoes on their birthday? The answer is because Asian tradition dictates giving someone shoes equates to asking someone to bear your burden. I asked a millennial Asian American to explain these superstitions from her point of view. Here, Stephanie Chen, 20, explains why it is considered bad luck to gift people shoes, clocks, and use the number four, as taught to her by her mother.

There was also the mention of Lunar New Year in the ways that Asian American millennials celebrate their heritage. Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year to some, is a festive celebration to ring in the new year according to the Chinese calendar. Lunar New Year falls on a different day every year but the traditions in large, remain the same. Here is a brief video about what the celebrations entail. Dani Chen, 23, explains some of the common celebration practices, as well as her favorite part of the holiday.

Tags: Fortune Cookie Moment · What's Happening in Baruch

Some Asian Superstitions Explained

November 9th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on Some Asian Superstitions Explained

As you may know, there are certain traditions, or rather, superstitions in the Asian culture. I went around the Baruch community and asked some young Asian Americans some of the common traditions that they practice at home. Here are their responses and some the common Asian superstitions explained by young millennials themselves.

Tags: Uncategorized

A Little Piece of History in Chinatown: The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)

October 26th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on A Little Piece of History in Chinatown: The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)

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“The location is interesting to say the least. We cater to many different types of people. On some days, we get a lot of international tourists, on others, we get a lot of second, third, even fourth generation Chinese Americans.” –Lauren Nechamkin, MOCA Education Manager

Located in the cross of Chinatown, Little Italy, and Soho, the Museum of Chinese in America began as a Chinatown History Project to promote a better understanding if the Chinese American experience. As an institution designed to preserve Chinese American culture, I visited the MOCA to find out more about what they were doing to attract millennial Asian New Yorkers.

According to Ms. Nechamkin, the museum is doing a great deal to reach out to the millennial population. From discounted memberships for students to special educational programs to movie screenings at Columbus Park, MOCA has increased their efforts to inform the millennial generation about the Asian American Experience. Some of these special education programs include a walking tour around Chinatown, one of New York City’s oldest neighborhoods, and workshops that address where stereotypes come from. When asked what some of the most common misconceptions were, I was told there is this false impression that there are certain stereotypes of Chinese Americans which MOCA intends to remedy.

If you are interested about in learning more about your heritage, here are some things you’ll find at MOCA:

  • Memory Prints by Mid-west artist Phillip Chen: is an exhibit where individuals can learn the basics of relief printing, an old printmaking process which consists of etching a printing surface, as well as experience the emotional landscape of an Chinese American family. These haunting prints explore the relationships between objects and images, history and memories.
  • MOCAEATS: is one of MOCA’s new program series on food and culture. MOCAEATS in particular is a conversation about food culture and family businesses where individuals can learn more about how Jason Wang of Xi’an Famous Foods and Lou Di Palo of Di Palo Selects succeeded in making their businesses thrive in New York City’s oldest and most famous neighborhood, Chinatown. This discussion will be followed by a sampling of their delicious dishes and treats.This event is free and open to the public.

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Tags: What's Happening in Chinatown

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)

October 26th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)

20141015_163759[1]

“The location is interesting to say the least. We cater to many different types of people. On some days, we get a lot of international tourists, on others, we get a lot of second, third, even fourth generation Chinese Americans.” –Lauren Nechamkin, MOCA Education Manager

Located in the cross of Chinatown, Little Italy, and Soho, the Museum of Chinese in America began as a Chinatown History Project to promote a better understanding if the Chinese American experience. As an institution designed to preserve Chinese American culture, I visited the MOCA to find out more about what they were doing to attract millennial Asian New Yorkers.

According to Ms. Nechamkin, the museum is doing a great deal to reach out to the millennial population. From discounted memberships for students to special educational programs to movie screenings at Columbus Park, MOCA has increased their efforts to inform the millennial generation about the Asian American Experience. Some of these special education programs include a walking tour around Chinatown, one of New York City’s oldest neighborhoods, and workshops that address where stereotypes come from. When asked what some of the most common misconceptions were, I was told there is this false impression that there are certain stereotypes of Chinese Americans which MOCA intends to remedy.

If you are interested about in learning more about your heritage, here are some things you’ll find at MOCA:

  • Memory Prints by Mid-west artist Phillip Chen: is an exhibit where individuals can learn the basics of relief printing, an old printmaking process which consists of etching a printing surface, as well as experience the emotional landscape of an Chinese American family. These haunting prints explore the relationships between objects and images, history and memories.
  • MOCAEATS: is one of MOCA’s new program series on food and culture. MOCAEATS in particular is a conversation about food culture and family businesses where individuals can learn more about how Jason Wang of Xi’an Famous Foods and Lou Di Palo of Di Palo Selects succeeded in making their businesses thrive in New York City’s oldest and most famous neighborhood, Chinatown. This discussion will be followed by a sampling of their delicious dishes and treats.This event is free and open to the public.

20141016_172800[1]

Tags: Uncategorized

Memoirs of a Global Citizen: Things to Keep in Mind While Traveling Abroad

October 26th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on Memoirs of a Global Citizen: Things to Keep in Mind While Traveling Abroad

James Wong, a 20-year-old international business major at Baruch College, hopes in his career to explore many different cultures aside from his own personal background. As a team member of AIESEC, a global ambassador, and an Asian American, Wong has found a way to express his heritage while traveling across Eastern Europe and experiencing different cultures.

AISEC is an international student run organization that provides internship opportunities and professional experiences for students abroad while breeding global leaders and promoting cultural awareness. In over 125 countries and 2400 universities, AIESEC Baruch sends the most students abroad every year. As a team member, Wong acts as a guide who assists students as they prepare for their own travel abroad journey.

Here is a recap of our interview as Wong shares his views on how his heritage plays into his travel abroad experience.

James Wong, 20, Brooklyn, Student at Baruch, International Business Major

IMG_164220521764757[1]

Wong interning abroad in Romania during the Spring 2013 semester.

Q: How do you identify yourself?
A: I am Malaysian and I identify myself as Asian American.

Q: What does being Asian American mean to you?
A: I don’t know what being an Asian American means to me. I don’t really categorize them into having any specific beliefs or traits, not myself at least.

Q: What is your role in AIESEC and how did you come to be involved with this organization?
A: I’m a team member and I became involved after going abroad to Romania. I loved the experience and wanted the opportunity to help others have the AIESEC experience.

Q: How does your background play into your role in AIESEC and affect your decision to go to certain countries?
A: It definitely contributes to the diversity of the organization. In terms of choosing countries, I’ve been to Malaysia and China before so I guess it made me want to see Europe, more so Eastern Europe because it is so much different than American culture.

Q: How does your Asian background influence your view of the world?
A:I think growing up in Brooklyn and around many Asian Americans, I had a lot of the view Asian Americans have such as when you grow up, you must go to college, do well in school, money is important. But my parents have a non-traditional background since they studied in the UK so I have mixed perception about things.

Q: Why do you think it is important to travel abroad and experience different cultures?
A: The world isn’t just where you live, and if you stay in the same place your whole life, you never realize a lot of things. Things like there’s more to life than money, there are beautiful places out there, different kinds of people, beliefs, and the world has a multitude of experiences to offer. It allows you to see things from a different perspective and realize that the world isn’t one dimensional. There’s no one answer to live life and that life is about your story and how you want to express it.

Q: How do you preserve your culture while still being a global citizen?
A: I don’t really have an answer to that. I don’t openly express my Asian culture. I guess it’s in the little things I do, how I dress, speak, say hi, give hugs, joke around. I don’t think of it as preserving. Oh, I celebrate Chinese New Year and get red envelopes.

Q: Where do you consider home?
A: America and I guess Malaysia.

Q: What do you wish you know about your culture?
A: I’m not looking to learn anything specific but I love diving into cultures and learning as much as I can about them to develop a better perception of the world.

Tags: On The Other Side of the World · Spotlight · What's Happening in Baruch

“How Do You Preserve Your Culture While Still Being A Global Citizen?”

October 26th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on “How Do You Preserve Your Culture While Still Being A Global Citizen?”

James Wong, a 20-year-old international business major at Baruch College, hopes in his career to explore many different cultures aside from his own personal background. As a team member of AIESEC, a global ambassador, and an Asian American, Wong has found a way to express his heritage while traveling across Eastern Europe and experiencing different cultures.

AISEC is an international student run organization that provides internship opportunities and professional experiences for students abroad while breeding global leaders and promoting cultural awareness. In over 125 countries and 2400 universities, AIESEC Baruch sends the most students abroad every year. As a team member, Wong acts as a guide who assists students as they prepare for their own travel abroad journey.

Here is a recap of our interview as Wong shares his views on how his heritage plays into his travel abroad experience.

James Wong, 20, Brooklyn, Student at Baruch, International Business Major

IMG_164220521764757[1]

Wong interning abroad in Romania during the Spring 2013 semester.

Q: How do you identify yourself?

A: I am Malaysian and I identify myself as Asian American.

 

Q: What does being Asian American mean to you?

A: I don’t know what being an Asian American means to me. I don’t really categorize them into having any specific beliefs or traits, not myself at least.

 

Q: What is your role in AIESEC and how did you come to be involved with this organization?

A: I’m a team member and I became involved after going abroad to Romania. I loved the experience and wanted the opportunity to help others have the AIESEC experience.

 

Q: How does your background play into your role in AIESEC and affect your decision to go to certain countries?

A: It definitely contributes to the diversity of the organization. In terms of choosing countries, I’ve been to Malaysia and China before so I guess it made me want to see Europe, more so Eastern Europe because it is so much different than American culture.

 

Q: How does your Asian background influence your view of the world?

A:I think growing up in Brooklyn and around many Asian Americans, I had a lot of the view Asian Americans have such as when you grow up, you must go to college, do well in school, money is important. But my parents have a non-traditional background since they studied in the UK so I have mixed perception about things.

 

Q: Why do you think it is important to travel abroad and experience different cultures?

A: The world isn’t just where you live, and if you stay in the same place your whole life, you never realize a lot of things. Things like there’s more to life than money, there are beautiful places out there, different kinds of people, beliefs, and the world has a multitude of experiences to offer. It allows you to see things from a different perspective and realize that the world isn’t one dimensional. There’s no one answer to live life and that life is about your story and how you want to express it.

 

Q: How do you preserve your culture while still being a global citizen?

A: I don’t really have an answer to that. I don’t openly express my Asian culture. I guess it’s in the little things I do, how I dress, speak, say hi, give hugs, joke around. I don’t think of it as preserving. Oh, I celebrate Chinese New Year and get red envelopes.

 

Q: Where do you consider home?

A: America and I guess Malaysia.

 

Q: What do you wish you know about your culture?

A: I’m not looking to learn anything specific but I love diving into cultures and learning as much as I can about them to develop a better perception of the world.

Tags: On The Other Side of the World · Spotlight

Second Generational Gap

October 19th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on Second Generational Gap

https://blogs.baruch.cuny.edu/secondgenerationalgap/

Tags: Uncategorized

Made in America: What Does It Mean to be Asian American?

October 15th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on Made in America: What Does It Mean to be Asian American?

Has the Asian culture been uprooted when the first generation of Asians immigrated to the US? As Asian Americans, we brand ourselves with Asian roots blended with American culture but the average millennial New York Asian American is slowly losing touch with their cultural roots than earlier generations, a trend that writers have recently identified. Bloggers like Phil Yu, also known as the Angry Asian Man, rants about the blatant discrimination towards Asian American in everyday scenarios but what exactly does being Asian American entail? Marq Hwang shares his perspective of “What Does It Mean To Be Asian American?” in the Huffington Post, where he makes an interesting remark, about the Asian in Asian American.

To be Asian American, you start to realize that you put more and more of yourself in the American category, and you view the Asian as a slight spin, like Irish, Newyorican, German. … Your blood might have come from overseas, but your heart started beating here.

I dug a little deeper and I found an article in New York Magazine, “Paper Tigers” where Wesley Yang publicizes his scorn for the timid Asian culture. He sees a reflection that he can neither disclaim nor accept.

How do we celebrate our heritage with such limited knowledge of our culture? I interviewed several millennial Asian Americans around New York who seemed to lack knowledge of the culture but openly told me what it meant for them to be Asian.

Eva Law, Age 20, Brooklyn, Student at Baruch, Accounting Major

eva

“Being Asian to me means believing that hard work will lead to results. It means celebrating Chinese New Year and being superstitious.”

Kelvin Kwong, Age 21, Queens, Student at Baruch, Accounting Major

kelvin

“I don’t know what it means to be Asian American. For me, I guess it means excelling at math and majoring in Accounting.”

 Stephanie Chen, Age 20, Brooklyn, Student at Baruch, Accounting Major

me

“Being Asian means having high expectations from my parents, my grandparents, especially as a first generation American.”

 Sean Chee, Age 19, Queens, Student at Baruch, Psychology Major

sean

“I’m proud to be Chinese American. As humans, it is natural to want to fit in and when I was a child. I used to be bullied because I was fat. It was easier for me to talk to other Chinese kids because we have similar lifestyles. As I got older, I learned to be more open. From my identity, I was able to be the person I am today, someone of sociability and open-mindedness.”

 Tin Lee, Age 20, Brooklyn, Student at Hunter, English Major

tin

“What makes me Asian is my ability to speak Chinese, however limited, still opens a lot of doors for me.”

Tags: Fortune Cookie Moment · On The Other Side of the World · Spotlight · What's Happening in Baruch · What's Happening in Chinatown

Made in America

October 15th, 2014 Written by | Comments Off on Made in America

Has the Asian culture been uprooted when the first generation of Asians immigrated to the US? As Asian Americans, we brand ourselves with Asian roots blended with American culture but the average millennial New York Asian American is slowly losing touch with their cultural roots than earlier generations, a trend that writers have recently identified. Bloggers like Phil Yu, also known as the Angry Asian Man, rants about the blatant discrimination towards Asian American in everyday scenarios but what exactly does being Asian American entail? Marq Hwang shares his perspective of “What Does It Mean To Be Asian American?” in the Huffington Post, where he makes an interesting remark, about the Asian in Asian American.

To be Asian American, you start to realize that you put more and more of yourself in the American category, and you view the Asian as a slight spin, like Irish, Newyorican, German. … Your blood might have come from overseas, but your heart started beating here.

I dug a little deeper and I found an article in New York Magazine, “Paper Tigers” where Wesley Yang publicizes his scorn for the timid Asian culture. He sees a reflection that he can neither disclaim nor accept.

How do we celebrate our heritage with such limited knowledge of our culture? I interviewed several millennial Asian Americans around New York who seemed to lack knowledge of the culture but openly told me what it meant for them to be Asian.

Eva Law, Age 20, Brooklyn, Student at Baruch, Accounting Major

eva

“Being Asian to me means believing that hard work will lead to results. It means celebrating Chinese New Year and being superstitious.”

Kelvin Kwong, Age 21, Queens, Student at Baruch, Accounting Major

kelvin

“I don’t know what it means to be Asian American. For me, I guess it means excelling at math and majoring in Accounting.”

 Stephanie Chen, Age 20, Brooklyn, Student at Baruch, Accounting Major

me

“Being Asian means having high expectations from my parents, my grandparents, especially as a first generation American.”

 Sean Chee, Age 19, Queens, Student at Baruch, Psychology Major

sean

“I’m proud to be Chinese American. As humans, it is natural to want to fit in and when I was a child. I used to be bullied because I was fat. It was easier for me to talk to other Chinese kids because we have similar lifestyles. As I got older, I learned to be more open. From my identity, I was able to be the person I am today, someone of sociability and open-mindedness.”

 Tin Lee, Age 20, Brooklyn, Student at Hunter, English Major

tin

“What makes me Asian is my ability to speak Chinese, however limited, still opens a lot of doors for me.”

Tags: Fortune Cookie Moment · On The Other Side of the World · Spotlight · What's Happening in Baruch · What's Happening in Chinatown

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