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Shūji Terayama Screening + Panel Discussion (Nov. 20th, 2017 @CUNY Graduate Center)

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Nihongo Chat + J-Culture at Japan Society

 Japan Society Language Center

Nihongo Chat + J-Culture

日本語と英語の語学交換会

Friday, November 17th, 6-7:30 pm

Join Japanese-language students and native Japanese speakers at this informal gathering to practice Japanese and English! Anyone with some Japanese language experience is welcome to attend.

日本人の方、英語を勉強中の方、ふるってご参加ください!日本に興味のある人たちや日本語を勉強中の人たちと楽しく会話をしましょう。

For 30 minutes during our November 17th meeting, special guest Kyo Kasumi will perform theatrical sword fighting called Tate. She will also demonstrate a unique combat style using a long stick and a fan. After the presentation, we will move back to the usual activity of practicing conversational skills.

 RSVP required!

Please RSVP to language@japansociety.org or 212-715-1269 with the following information: name, email address, telephone number, level of Japanese (beginner, intermediate, advanced, native)

 Admission

$5 cash only,

free for students with valid university I.D.

(refreshments provided)

 

 

 

The Nihongo Chat + J-Culture series is presented in partnership with New York University, Hunter College and The New School.  This program is generously supported by The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles.

 

 

For more classes and events at the Language Center, visit www.japansociety.org/language


 

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Throw Away Your Books: The Films of Shūji Terayama

Throw Away Your Books: The Films of Shūji Terayama

・Martin E Segal Theater(New York, NY):November 20

http://thesegalcenter.org/event/shuji-terayamas/

・Anthology Film Archives(New York, NY):November 21 –December 10

http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/series/48215

http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_screenings/buy-tickets

Shuji Terayama was a playwright, novelist, filmmaker and cultural agent provocateur who was one of the most influential and innovative figures in the post-WWII Japanese avant-garde. Created over the course of only 20 years, Terayama’s body of work as a filmmaker comprises five theatrical features, as well as more than a dozen shorter pieces. Subjects of his films include everything from relatively straightforward narratives, to phantasmagoric memory pieces and expanded cinema works that incorporate multiple projectors and even audience participation. This retrospective represents the most comprehensive survey of Terayama’s work to occur in the U.S. in decades.

This film series is co-presented by Harvard Film Archive, Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, Anthology Film Archives, George Eastman Museum, National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo and The Japan Foundation.

SPECIAL IN-PERSON APPEARANCES
On November 21 & 22, the programs of short films will be presented in person by Terayama’s colleague and collaborator Henrikku Morisaki, as well as by Chizuru Usui, Assistant Curator at the National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.

On Monday, November 20, the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (365 Fifth Avenue) will host a special event during which Henrikku Morisaki will present two films involving performative elements (LAURA and THE TRIAL), followed by a panel discussion on Terayama’s work. For more info visit: www.thesegalcenter.org.

SERIES DETAILS:

SHŪJI TERAYAMA SHORT FILMS
With the exception of THE WAR OF JAN-KEN PON, EMPEROR TOMATO KETCHUP, and GRASS LABYRINTH, all the films in these programs have been restored by the National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.

PROGRAM 1:
THE CAGE / KANSHŪ 1964, 11 min, 16mm
THE WAR OF JAN-KEN PON / JANKENSENSŌ 1971, 12 min, 16mm
EMPEROR TOMATO KETCHUP / TOMATO KECHAPPU KŌTEI 1971, 27 min, 16mm
BUTTERFLY DRESS PLEDGE / CHŌFUKU-KI 1974, 12 min, 35mm
YOUNG PERSON’S GUIDE TO CINEMA / SEISHŌNEN NO TAME NO EIGA NYŪMON 1974, 3 min, triple-screen 16mm
Total running time: ca. 70 min.
Tues, Nov 21 at 7:00 and Sun, Dec 3 at 5:00.

PROGRAM 2:
THE LABYRINTH TALE / MEIKYŪ-TAN 1975, 16 min, 16mm
A TALE OF SMALLPOX / HŌSŌ-TAN 1975, 31 min, 16mm
THE ERASER / KESHIGOMU 1977, 20 min, 16mm
Total running time: ca. 70 min.
Tues, Nov 21 at 9:00 and Sun, Dec 3 at 6:45.

PROGRAM 3:
LES CHANTS DE MALDOROR / MARUDORORU NO UTA 1977, 27 min, 16mm
AN ATTEMPT TO DESCRIBE THE MEASURE OF A MAN / ISSUNBŌSHI WO KIJUTSUSURU KOKOROMI 1977, 19 min, 16mm
THE WOMAN WITH TWO HEADS: A SHADOW FILM / KAGE NO EIGA: NITŌ ONNA 1977, 16 min, 16mm
Total running time: ca. 65 min.
Wed, Nov 22 at 7:00 and Sun, Dec 3 at 8:30.

PROGRAM 4:
THE READING MACHINE / SHOKENKI 1977, 22 min, 16mm
FATHER / CHICHI 1977, 3 min, 16mm
GRASS LABYRINTH / KUSA-MEIKYŪ 1983, 40 min, 35mm. From The Japan Foundation Film Library.
Total running time: ca. 70 min.
Wed, Nov 22 at 9:00 and Sat, Dec 9 at 7:00.

THROW AWAY YOUR BOOKS, RALLY IN THE STREETS / SHO O SUTEYO MACHI E DEYOU
1971, 137 min, 35mm. In Japanese with English subtitles. Archival print courtesy of the National Film and Sound Archive, Australia.
Typically for Terayama, his first feature began life not as a film but rather as a stage piece produced by the Tenjô Sajiki theater group that Terayama and others had formed in 1967. It would then give its title to a multi-media book that Terayama produced with the now-legendary artist Yokoo Tadanori. These unusual origins are apparent in the film’s collage-like mix of disparate materials and narrative elements, all of it cohering around the figure of Eimei, a socioeconomically marginalized young man swept up in the countercultural currents transforming Japan at the time. At once a document of a tumultuous era, a call to arms, and a self-conscious critique of its own medium, THROW AWAY YOUR BOOKS is one of the most audacious films of the 1970s.
Thurs, Nov 30 at 7:30 and Mon, Dec 4 at 7:30.

THE BOXER / BOKUSÂ
1977, 94 min, 16mm. In Japanese with English subtitles. From The Japan Foundation Film Library.
Terayama channeled his lifelong interest in boxing into this film, and while it was by far his most conventional and commercially acceptable movie to date (it was produced on the heels of the worldwide phenomenon that was ROCKY), his deeply personal preoccupation with the sport and its trappings results in a fascinating fusion of avant-garde sensibility and classic narrative. Focusing on the relationship between a young man determined to become a champion and his reluctant, middle-aged coach, THE BOXER succeeds both as a work of startling visual beauty and as a compulsively exciting story, with Terayama’s investment in the sport apparent in his casting of actual Japanese boxers in cameo roles.
Fri, Dec 1 at 7:00.

FRUITS OF PASSION / LES FRUITS DE LA PASSION
1981, 83 min, 35mm. In Japanese and French with English subtitles. From The Japan Foundation Film Library.
Certainly the unlikeliest film in Terayama’s filmography, FRUITS OF PASSION is a work-for-hire adaptation of the sequel to THE STORY OF O, the classic erotic novel by Pauline Réage. THE STORY OF O had been brought to the screen to modest success in 1975 (with Udo Kier in the starring role), but the hiring of Terayama to helm the sequel was probably the result of the international fanfare surrounding Nagisa Oshima’s IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES, whose producer Anatole Dauman was responsible for FRUITS OF PASSION. Though FRUITS never ascends to the heights of IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES, with Terayama’s vision clearly subordinated to the demands of the soft-core genre, it’s nevertheless fascinating to observe him working in this context, especially with Udo Kier having morphed into a similarly ubiquitous figure in commercial European cinema of the time, the infamous Klaus Kinski.
Fri, Dec 1 at 9:15 and Sun, Dec 10 at 7:00.

PASTORAL HIDE AND SEEK / DEN’EN NI SHISU
1974, 104 min, 35mm. In Japanese with English subtitles. From The Japan Foundation Film Library.
Arguably Terayama’s masterpiece, PASTORAL HIDE AND SEEK also speaks to his refusal to submit to the constraints of any particular medium and his proclivity for revisiting themes and ideas. Like THROW AWAY YOUR BOOKS, PASTORAL took multiple forms over the years: manifesting first as a television broadcast in 1962, it then gave its title to a poetry collection Terayama published in 1965, only to reappear in 1974 as this extraordinary film. The recurring nature of the title and its attendant concepts is all too appropriate for a film that is one of the cinema’s great meditations on memory and childhood. A profoundly personal work of art, in which chronology, identity, and logic give way to a free association of images and ideas, PASTORAL is autobiography as surrealist phantasmagoria.
Sat, Dec 2 at 6:15 and Fri, Dec 8 at 7:00.

FAREWELL TO THE ARK / SARABA HAKOBUNE
1984, 127 min, 16mm. In Japanese with English subtitles. From The Japan Foundation Film Library.
“Set in a fictional village, FAREWELL TO THE ARK is an epic story that charts the ups and downs of a family over the course of a century or so. The film presents several dichotomies, including rulers and ruled, community and outsiders, backwardness and civilization, all of which take place against the backdrop of a world full of illusion and eroticism. At the time, Terayama was suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, but in a seeming collision course with oblivion, he turned down requests for hospital treatment and doggedly continued shooting on location in Okinawa. Filming was suspended twice, and at times a simple bed was brought on set and Terayama directed while lying down. Weaving together an intricate tapestry of life and death, space and time, FAREWELL TO THE ARK represents the culmination of Terayama’s work.” –TOKYO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
Sat, Dec 2 at 8:45 and Sun, Dec 10 at 9:00.

Special thanks to Kanako Shirasaki, Koji Nozaki & Sanae Tani (The Japan Foundation); Akira Tochigi & Chizuru Usui (National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo); Henrikku Morisaki; Go Hirasawa; Julian Ross; Steph Carter & Caitlyn Leon (National Film and Sound Archive of Australia); Thomas Dylan Eaton; the Globus Family; Haden Guest, Jeremy Rossen & Brittany Gravely (Harvard Film Archive); Emi Haraguchi (Toho); Frank Hentschker, Peter Eckersall & Brad Burgess (The Segal Center); Hiroshi Kono (Mar Creation); Jurij Meden (George Eastman Museum); and Naoki Shinozaki (Toei)

 

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Shūji Terayama retrospective in NYC!

Shūji Terayama’s Laura (Rora), Trial (Shinpan), and Americans, who are you? (America-jin Anata-wa): Performance Screenings with Terayama collaborator, Henrikku Morisaki

Start:
Nov 20, 2017
End:
Nov 20, 2017
Category:

Photo courtesy of the artists

Monday, November 20
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Performance Screenings with Terayama collaborator, Henrikku Morisaki

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

This evening will feature rare screenings of films by legendary avantgarde Japanese poet, dramatist, writer, film director, and photographer Shūji Terayama. Many critics view him as one of the most productive and provocative creative artists to come out of Japan. He has been cited as an influence on various Japanese filmmakers from the 1970s onward.

One of the screenings, Laura, will include the restaging of Terayama’s 1974 film performance with the original actor, Henrikku Morisaki. The screenings are part of a retrospective tour of Shūji Terayama works at Anthology Film Archives (Nov. 21-Dec. 10) and Harvard Film Archive.

The Trial (Shinpan) [Japan 1975, 16mm, color, 34 min]
Directed by Shūji Terayama, no subtitles
With Keiko Niitaka, Yoko Ran, Sueshi Sasada
The Trial begins as a man hammers nails into a city street before normal social order collapses and the ‘disturbance’ spreads to an act of violent audience participation; Terayama made this work for projection on a specially constructed screen and provides blank film at the end as an invitation for audience members to abandon their position as spectators.

Laura (Rora) [Japan 1974, 16mm, color, 9 min]
Directed by Shūji Terayama, Japanese with English subtitles
Inspired by the unfulfilled affair between Laura and Alec in the 1945 British feature, Brief Encounter, Terayama’s outrageous screen fantasy features the onscreen appearances of painted strippers who hurl insults at the audience. One spectator/performer, actor Henrikku Morisaki, will enter the film and emerge clutching his torn clothes, after being stripped and assaulted on
celluloid.

Americans, who are you? / America-jin Anata-wa
[Japan 1967, Black and White, 45 min]
Directed by Haruhiko Hagimoto, Written by Shuji Terayama
Produced by Tokyo Broadcasting System Holdings, Inc.
A rare chance to see a documentary by Shuji Terayama –and one that was shot in the United States and made for Japanese television. In this portrait of mid-1960s USA, a Japanese woman confronts passersby on the street with a set of questions devised by Terayama, who once declared he’d like to become a question mark.

Followed by a discussion with Terayama collaborator Henrikku Morisaki, professors Julia Alekseyeva (CUNY Brooklyn), Peter Eckersall (GC, CUNY), Tom Looser (NYU), and Alex Zahlten (Havard University), and Chizuru Usui (National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo).

The 2017 Terayama retrospective tour is presented in partnership with Harvard Film Archive, Anthology Film Archives, the George Eastman Museum, The Japan Foundation, and the National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, with the generous support of the Kinoshita Group.

Special thanks: Theodore C. Bestor and Stacie Matsumoto—Reischauer Institute, Harvard; Haden Guest (Director), Jeremy Rossen, Brittany Gravely–Harvard Film Archive; Hisashi Okajima, Akira Tochigi and Chizuru Usui—National Film Center, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; Kanako Shirasaki, Koji Nozaki, Sanae Tani–the Japan Foundation; Jed Rapfogel—Anthology Film Archives; Julian Ross; Go Hirasawa.

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Calligraphy Workshop by BJC + Nakamura-sensei (Thursday, Nov. 9th, 2017)

Greetings,

Happy November and thank you for coming to our Yukata Dressing event last Thursday!

If you were not able to attend, we are happy to announce that we will be having a Calligraphy Workshop on Thursday, November 9th in NVC 4-175 during club hours (12:45 pm – 2:30 pm). Our instructor will be Nakamura-sensei! Please see the flyer below.

 

Greetings,

Happy November and thank you for coming to our Yukata Dressing event last Thursday!

If you were not able to attend, we are happy to announce that we will be having a Calligraphy Workshop on Thursday, November 9th in NVC 4-175 during club hours (12:45 pm – 2:30 pm). Our instructor will be Nakamura-sensei! Please see the flyer below.

Also, please see our “Career Opportunities” section below to learn more about Japan-related jobs!

1) The New York Career Academy will be hosting an Interview Workshop on Saturday, November 11th from 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm at the following address:

Global Labo
545 8th Ave Rm 1410, New York, New York 10018

This event is perfect for Japanese-bilinguals or those who would like to possibly work in Japan someday.

Important Notes:
★ Please click “Interview Workshop” for more details.
★ No business attire is needed and there will be English used alongside Japanese.

 

Copyright © 2017 Japan Club, All rights reserved.
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Our mailing address is:
Japan Club
55 Lexington Ave
Room 3-249
New York, NY 10010

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Boren Awards: Language Study and Research in East Asia

 

 

 

 

SUBJECT: Boren Awards: Language Study and Research in East Asia

The application for the 2018 Boren Awards is now open at www.borenawards.org!

Boren Awards fund U.S. undergraduate and graduate language study and research abroad in world regions critical to U.S.national interests (including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East). Boren Awardspromote longer‐term linguistic and cultural immersion overseas, and are available to applicants in most fields of study.

Boren Awards will give preference to applicants planning to study in a number of East & Southeast Asian countries including Japan. Preference is also given to students who are willing to study abroad for longer periods of time, and those who are highly motivatedto work in the federal government following graduation.

The Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 for undergraduate students for language‐focused study abroad.

The Boren Fellowships provide up to $30,000 for graduate students to fund language study, graduate‐level research, and academicinternships abroad.

Webinars on aspects of the Boren Awards, including special regional initiatives and components of the application are scheduledthroughout the 2017‐2018 academic year. Sign up today at www.borenawards.org/webinars.html. Additional information onpreferred countries, languages, and fields of study can be found at www.borenawards.org.

Applicants are encouraged to contact their Boren Awards campus representatives, listed in a directory on the website, for institution‐specific guidance. They may also contact Boren Awards staff directly at 1‐800‐618‐NSEP or boren@iie.org.

 

 

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Deadline Approaching-2018 Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program Application Closing November 15!

The CLS Program is an intensive overseas language and cultural immersion program for American students enrolled at U.S. colleges and universities. Students spend eight to ten weeks abroad studying one of 14 critical languages. The program includes intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences designed to promote rapid language gains.

CLS, a program of the U.S. Department of State, is part of a wider government initiative to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering foreign languages that are critical to national security and economic prosperity. CLS plays an important role in preparing students for the 21st century’s globalized workforce and increasing national competitiveness.

The CLS Program seeks participants with diverse interests, and from a wide range of fields of study and career paths, with the purpose of representing the full diversity of the United States. Participants are selected based on their commitment to language learning and plans to apply their language skills to their future academic or professional pursuits. Students from all academic disciplines, including business, engineering, law, medicine, science, social sciences, arts and humanities are encouraged to apply.

The application is now live and available online at:  http://www.clscholarship.org

Applications are due November 15, 2017 by 7:59pm EST.

We have two informational videos available for you and your interested students to review:

CLS Program Overview: https://youtu.be/YwN8qQTYmJI

Tips for Writing a Successful Application: https://youtu.be/Mvb6luXq2BE

Download a one-page flyer to promote the CLS Program in your community.

The fourteen languages offered by the CLS Program are:

  • Arabic
  • Azerbaijani
  • Bangla
  • Chinese
  • Hindi
  • Indonesian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Persian
  • Punjabi
  • Russian
  • Swahili
  • Turkish
  • Urdu

Most languages offered by the CLS Program do not require applicants to have any experience studying critical languages. Language pre-requisites can be found on our website at http://www.clscholarship.org/about.

Prior to preparing their application, interested students should review the full eligibility and application information on the CLS Program website.

For news, updates and more information about the CLS Program, check out the CLS website or our Facebook page for updates!

CLS Website: http://www.clscholarship.org

CLS Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/CLScholarship

CLS Twitter page: https://twitter.com/CLSscholarship

For other questions, please contact us at: cls@americancouncils.org

Contact Info:

Stephanie Li

Senior Program Officer, Critical Language Scholarship Program

American Councils for International Education

1828 L Street NW., Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20036

phone: (202)-833-7522 / fax: (202)-833-7523

email: sli@americancouncils.org

www.americancouncils.org

Contact Email:
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Talk by Dr. Erik Jacobson at Montclair State University (Oct. 31st, 2017)

https://www.montclair.edu/calendar/view-event.php?id=48456

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Maid Cafe at Baruch College! (Thurs., Oct. 26th, 2017)

 

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Manga University of New York (MUNY) at Resobox (Oct., 13th, 2017 7:00pm – 9:00pm)

Manga University of New York (MUNY)

Date October 13, 2017 7:00pm – 9:00pm (or later!)

Event Link:  http://resobox.com/event/muny/

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