Monthly Archives: February 2015

Looking for Native English Speakers (students)!

From: Prof. Elisabeth Gareis, Communication Studies

Interest in the Conversation Partners Program on the part of nonnative speakers has beenextraordinarily high, and we need more native students to create matches. Please encourage students who are native speakers of English to participate.

The program matches native and nonnative speakers of English for informal conversations and is a great way for native speakers to gain experience in communicating across language barriers, to expand their cultural knowledge, make friends, and build a network of professional contacts. To participate, students should be willing to commit to meeting their partner about one hour per week. Participants will receive a certificate at the end of the semester, which is a great way to enhance one’s resume.

For more information and to sign up, go to http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/cpp

The deadline for signing up is Friday, February 13.

Thank you!

 

Elisabeth Gareis
Professor
Dept. of Communication Studies, B8-240
Baruch College
55 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10010
Tel.: (646) 312-3731
Fax: (646) 312-3721
E-mail: egareis@baruch.cuny.edu
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/wsas/academics/communication/egareis.htm

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Opening Night: When Marnie was There at NEW YORK INT’L CHILDREN’S FILM FESTIVAL

99_EdpNORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE – The newest feature from Japan’s famed Studio Ghibli is a sweeping story of friendship, mystery, and discovery that delivers stirring emotions and breathtaking animation as only Ghibli can. When shy, artistic Anna moves to the seaside to live with her aunt and uncle, she stumbles upon an old mansion surrounded by marshes, and the mysterious young girl, Marnie, who lives there. The two girls instantly form a unique connection and friendship that blurs the lines between fantasy and reality. As the days go by, a nearly magnetic pull draws Anna back to the Marsh House again and again, and she begins to piece together the truth surrounding her strange new friend. Based on the novel by Joan G. Robinson, and directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi (The Secret World of Arriety), When Marnie Was There has been described as “Ghibli Gothic,” with its moonlit seascapes, glowing orchestral score, and powerful dramatic portrayals that build to a stormy climax. In Japanese with English subtitles.

http://www.gkids.com/

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The Magical Art of Translation: From Haruki Murakami to Japan’s Latest Storytellers (Thursday, May 7, 6:30 PM)

Another Event at JApan Society 
The Magical Art of Translation: From Haruki Murakami to Japan's Latest Storytellers

LECTURE

The Magical Art of Translation: From Haruki Murakami to Japan’s Latest Storytellers

Thursday, May 7, 6:30 PM

Buy Tickets

Jay Rubin, Ted Goossen, Aoko Matsuda, Satoshi Kitamura, Motoyuki Shibata, Roland Kelts.

Since 1989, Jay Rubin has translated many of Haruki Murakami’s most successful and prize-winning novels, including The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Norwegian Wood and 1Q84. In this program, he is joined byTed Goossen, translator of Murakami’s most recent U.S. publications, The Strange Library (Knopf, December 2014) and Wind/Pinball: Two Early Novels (Knopf, August 2015), and co-editor of Monkey Business literary magazine, which showcases the best of contemporary Japanese literature for an international audience. They will discuss the unique challenges of translating modern Japanese literary works into American English, and vice versa. Rubin will also talk about his transition from translator to novelist vis-à-vis his debut novel The Sun Gods.

Joining the discussion from Tokyo will be authors Aoko Matsuda and Satoshi Kitamura, and Motoyuki Shibata, friend and translating partner of Murakami, former University of Tokyo professor, and the Japanese translator of such American literary luminaries as Paul Auster and Thomas Pynchon. AuthorRoland Kelts, co-editor of Monkey Business, moderates the discussion. Followed by a reception.


Tickets:
$12/$8 Japan Society members, students & seniors

This program is funded, in part, by a generous grant from The Japan Foundation, New York.
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